Tag Archives: Small Traditions

Small Traditions LLC’s Spring Premium “Black Magic” Auction Presents The Joe Morrison Collection; Auction Preview & Consignments Wanted by 4/15

Important Note Regarding Consignments Wanted by 4/15: In addition to the items featured throughout this post, Small Traditions LLC is seeking a small selection of additional high-end items valued $1,000 and up for our 4th Annual Spring Premium Auction. The auction is already nearly full, so please don’t wait until the consignment deadline of April 15th, especially if you’d like to guarantee premium placement for your premium items, and especially if you’d like to take advantage of our Cost-Free Grading promotion. Call 303.832.1975 or write info@smalltraditions.com today.

March 23, 2016 – Denver, CO.  Like most athletes who played parts of their careers in the Empire State, Joe Morrison of the New York Football Giants earned his share of nicknames: Old Dependable, they called him, Mr. Versatility, Captain, Most Valuable Player, Mr. Wonderful even. After his playing career, he earned yet another name when he surprised the nation and coached the USC Gamecocks to the Gator Bowl, earning himself honors as the Walter Camp National College Football Coach of the Year. “The Man in Black,” they dubbed him in Columbia. And USC’s unforgettable season: “Black Magic.”

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“The Ultimate Team Player,” Giants owner Wellington Mara called him, Morrison didn’t just play part of his career in New York. He played all 14 seasons of it there. Drafted in 1959 out of Cincinnati, where he still holds most team passing and scoring records, the Lima, Ohio native played seven different positions in blue until his retirement in 1972. At the press conference in which he announced his retirement, then Giants head coach Alex Webster told the crowd that nobody would ever wear #40 for the Giants again, and so Old Dependable became the tenth player in team history to be honored by having his jersey retired.

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To this day, Morrison remains among the Giants’ team leaders in several categories:

  • 14 Years Played — 2nd
  • 184 Games Played — 5th
  • 65 Total Touch Downs — 3rd
  • 47 Receiving Touch Downs — 3rd
  • 395 Receptions — 3rd
  • 4,993 Receiving Yards — 4th

Some other statistics that can’t be found at Pro-Football-Reference.com include Morrison’s seven seasons named as team captain and his five team MVP awards. Even more impressive than his numbers, however, was the high esteem in which he was held by teammates, coaches, student players, community leaders, and fans. Indeed, long before other accomplished New York captains like Thurman Munson and Derek Jeter captured the hearts of the sporting world, there was Joe Morrison. Always there. Always dependable. Always respected.

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A testament to both his leadership and his knowledge of the game, Coach Joe Morrison was one of only a few major college head coaches to never serve as an assistant coach. In 1987, he earned further recognition as the Southern Independent Coach of the Year, and in 1988 he earned yet another honor with his selection as one of three head coaches to lead the East players in the College Football All Star Game at the Hula Bowl. A year later, after winning his 100th game at age 51, he tragically fell victim to congestive heart failure, leaving the USC community and the college football world in shock, and departing this world just as abruptly as he had seemed to storm it.

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Some notable names who played or coached under Joe Morrison include:

  • Charlie Weis
  • Al Groh
  • Robert Brooks
  • Sterling Sharpe
  • Harold Green
  • Brad Edwards

Small Traditions LLC is honored to have been selected to present the Joe Morrison Collection in our forthcoming April online event, from 4/17 to 4/30, which we have appropriately dubbed our Spring Premium “Black Magic” Auction. In addition to an impressive selection of high-grade sports cards and rare autographs, the auction will also include the following items from the estate of Coach Joe Morrison, several of which are previewed throughout this post:

  • Joe Morrison 1959 Rookie Year Game-Used New York Giants #40 Jersey
  • Joe Morrison 1958 College All Stars Full Uniform
  • 1959 New York Giants Eastern Division Champions Team Signed Football
  • Iconic Coach Joe Morrison Black Jacket Worn During Every Game
  • Joe Morrison Game-Worn 1984 Gator Bowl Sweater
  • Joe Morrison College Recruitment Letter Collection
  • Joe Morrison NY Giants Correspondence Collection w/ 1972 Contract
  • 1967 NFL Touchdown Club Most Valuable Player Award
  • 1985 Frank McGuires Award for Athletic Excellence
  • 1988 Commemorative 100th Win Sterling Silver Plate
  • 1987 Hand Written Letter From President George H. Bush

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Bid Now on 1,500 Lots in Small Traditions Massive Spring Training Oddballs & Autographs Auction w/ Spring Premium Sneak Peak

With 1,500 lots, Small Traditions LLC’s current Spring Training Oddballs & Autographs Auction is our biggest event yet. The auction is underway and closes on Saturday night, March 5th. There aren’t any five-figure Mickey Mantle or Willie Mays rookie cards — we’re saving those for our April Premium Auction, a sneak peak of which appears below — but up for grabs is a staggering number of graded cards from regional and oddball sets, plus wax boxes, autographs, rare game-worn patch, jersey, and bat cards, and other memorabilia.

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Navigate All 1,500 Lots with Just a Few Clicks of Your Mouse

The auction has been organized and interlinked to help bidders navigate all 1,500 lots with just a few clicks of their mouses. When programmed to display 100 lots per page, there are 15 catalog pages, each of which presents a hyperlinked and expandable category menu along its left side. Similarly, each individual lot listing presents a smaller group of hyperlinks related to that particular lot below its title. Simply click the hyperlinks to explore all 1,500 lots within the auction. Highlights from some of the more popular (and populous) categories include the following:

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Premium $1,000+ Items Wanted at 0% For Our Fourth Annual Spring Premium Auction

Please call 303.832.1975 or write info@smalltraditions.com today to consign your high-end collectibles to our 4th Annual Exclusive 100-Lot Spring Premium Auction. The auction is already filling up fast, so don’t wait until the consignment deadline of April 15th, especially if you’d like to guarantee premium placement for your premium items, and especially if you’d like to take advantage of our Cost-Free Grading program.

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Exceptionally Presentable 1951 Bowman Mickey Mantle Rookie Card

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Joe Morrison 1959 New York Giants Rookie Jersey

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Joe Morrison 1959 College All-Stars Jersey

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Immaculate 1959 Giants Team-Signed Eastern Division Champions Football

The Tucson Find: One of The Largest & Most Comprehensive Collections Ever Assembled Up For Auction

Beginning with our current Super Bowl 50 Auction, which ends this Saturday night, February the 6th, Small Traditions will be offering several thousand PSA-graded single cards and complete sets in binders from the historic Tucson Find this past summer. What exactly is the Tucson Find? Without exaggeration, the Tucson Find is among the largest, most comprehensive and impressive sports card collections ever assembled. The collection consists of nearly 4,000 binders, most of which contained multiple sets, complete with all inserts, errors and other variations, spanning all brands from all sports, dating from the 1940s through the early 2000s.

Not only is the Tucson Find remarkable for its breadth and inclusiveness, but the collection is noted for its meticulous attention to the condition of the hundreds of thousands of cards it contains. Even the cards from the 1940s and 1950s display immaculate, pack-fresh qualities, with particular attention to centering and to bold colors. In fact, the collection yielded the hobby’s second-ever 1953 Topps Mickey Mantle to grade PSA 10 Gem Mint at The National Sports Collectors Convention in Chicago this past summer, and every one of the 1,000s of single cards submitted by Small Traditions and being offered this winter has graded either PSA 10 Gem Mint or PSA 9 Mint, with ample opportunities for upgrades or crossovers to BGS 9.5 Gem Mint and BGS 10 Pristine.

Small Traditions is honored to have been selected to handle the modern portion of the Tucson Find, dating from 1980 through the early 2000s, and we are offering several thousand PSA-graded singles and complete sets still in binders in the following events:

Importantly, sets that contained key rookie cards of considerable value, such as the 1998 SP Authentic Football set, have been broken for grading and are not being offered in set form. An overwhelming number of complete sets, however, still offer an abundance of grading opportunities. Judging by the PSA 10 1953 Topps Mantle and the thousands of other cards graded PSA 9 Mint and PSA 10 Gem Mint, the offered sets are likewise in Mint to Gem Mint condition and boast considerable value, especially with their minimum bid prices of between $25 and $50.

If you have not already, register for Small Traditions monthly auctions here.

Learn how to grade and auction your cards and don’t spend a penny out-of-pocket.

Collecting The Captain

10 Important Things To Know About Collecting Derek Jeter

14462a_lgby Dave Thorn

Dave Thorn is the founder of Small Traditions LLC, an online sports and Americana auction company that conducts monthly auctions in which selling is completely free and buyers pay the fees instead of sellers. This month’s Exclusive Derek Jeter September Farewell Auction features the key highlights from one of the most admired Derek Jeter collections in the hobby. With so many significant Jeter items coming to market this month, here are 10 important things to know about collecting Derek Jeter, especially for those who want to better understand his many different types of cards produced over the last 23 yeras — rookies, proofs, parallels, oddballs, inserts, autographs, Refractors, etc. — and which are the most valuable.

14480b_lg1. Derek Jeter has accomplished all of the following (see #s 2-10) without any remote suspicion of using Performance Enhancing Drugs. Quite the opposite, the mission of Jeter’s Turn 2 Foundation is to “motivate young people to turn away from drugs and alcohol and ‘TURN 2’ healthy lifestyles.” Just as his perennial postseason heroics in the late 90s helped baseball’s popularity to recover from the embarrassment of the strike-shortened 1994 season, Jeter’s consistently clean and classy style of play has helped to preserve the integrity of the National Pastime throughout its steroid era.

15395a_lg2. Some of his pinstripe predecessors might have won more World Series rings than Jeter’s 5 — Yogi has 10, DiMaggio 9, Mantle and Ruth both 7 — but Mr. November has more postseason batting records than any other player, not just in the Yankees’ books but in all of baseball history. Keeping in mind that baseball only played one round of playoffs until 1969 and that it now plays three, Jeter is the all-time postseason hitting leader in ten categories, including hits (200), runs (111), total bases (302), singles (143), doubles (32), triples (5), games played (158), at bats (650), and plate appearances (734). He ranks third in postseason home runs (20), fourth in postseason RBI (61), fifth in postseason walks (66), and sixth in postseason stolen bases (18). His postseason numbers represent an entire season’s worth of games, and a very good season at that. And for those who say hooey to postseason records, then consider that Derek is also one of just two players to ever accumulate 3,000 hits, 250 home runs, 300 stolen bases, and 1,200 RBI in the history of the game. The other player? Willie Mays.

15622a_lg3. Derek is one of just 28 players in baseball’s elite 3,000 hit club. He achieved his 3,000th hit on the biggest stage in baseball and with more pomp than any other player before him, hitting a home run off one of the best pitchers in baseball, going 5-5 on the day, and driving in the game’s winning run, a performance that will be remembered and replayed forever.

14501a_lg4. And the hits didn’t stop there. This summer, Derek passed the immortal Honus Wagner for most hits ever by a shortstop, and then he passed Adrian “Cap” Anson to earn the #6 spot on baseball’s all-time hits leaders list. Those who will remain ahead of him in the top five are Tris Speaker, Stan Musial, Hank Aaron, Ty Cobb, and Pete Rose. That’s not just good company he’s in; it’s the greatest ever. What is perhaps most remarkable about Jeter’s standing among these players, however, is that Speaker and Musial both played 22 seasons, Aaron played 23, and Cobb and Rose both played 24. Jeter, just 20. His way, and on his terms.

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5. In short, Derek Jeter is one of baseball’s all-time greats, and we’ve been more than lucky to watch his career. His famous “flip” play in the bottom of the seventh inning in Game 3 of the 2001 ALDS, his gutsy “dive” into the stands against the Red Sox, and his clutch hitting and never-ever-hesitating hustle will be highlights for the eternity of baseball. He stands in direct lineage to those who wore single-digit NY Yankee jerseys before him: 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, and 1. Like all these legends in pinstripes, Derek’s legacy will only continue to grow after he retires, bridging the generation gap as only baseball can do, as millions of fans face the existential question: will there really ever be another like him?

15758a_lg6. Drafted straight out of Kalamazoo Central High School and quickly becoming one of the most touted prospects in Yankee history, Derek can be found on 325 different baseball cards produced between his draft year of 1992 and his rookie season of 1996, and there is considerable debate about whether or not all of these cards should be considered rookie cards. His traditional rookie card year has always been 1993, but collecting has changed in recent years, and most collectors are now more inclined to pursue his many more challenging cards produced during his ROY-winning season of 1996, when we watched with wonder as the rookie helped lead the Yankees to their first World Series Championship in nearly two decades, than to collect only his cards from 1993, when he batted .295 in his first full season of Single A, still three seasons away from his official MLB rookie season.

15335a_lg7. Jeter’s rookie years of 1992 to 1996 correspond to the hobby development of insert or “chase” cards — special, limited edition cards randomly inserted into packs, many of which were super-short-printed variations, or parallel versions, of a player’s regular or base card — and his rookie season of 1996 would be the first year that saw products with significantly more than the two basic tiers of print runs that had thus far characterized the insert card development of the early to mid 1990s. Instead of products with just a regularly issued card and a single parallel insert of that regular issue — like Finest Refractors, Topps Gold, and Upper Deck Electric Diamond, for example — there were now products by Bowman, Leaf, and Select Certified that had as many as a half dozen different parallels, each one produced in smaller quantities than the last, some with print runs as small as just 30. Scarcer than even the T206 Wagner, cards like the famous 1996 Select Certified Mirror Gold are also some of the most beautiful cards ever made. Their development happened during Derek’s rookie season, which makes collecting his rookie season cards that much more challenging and fun.15619a_lg

8. If 1992-1996 is the birth of modern insert cards, then 1997-1999 is their renaissance or golden age. During the late ’90s, modern card manufacturers developed several more innovations that now, two decades later, still dominate the industry. These innovations included game-used cards, serial-numbered cards, and the development of the ever coveted 1/1 or one-of-one masterpiece cards, when manufacturers produced an ultimate parallel of a particular card limited to just one single copy made. Finally, let’s also not forget the incredible die-cut cards developed during the period, which may be common encounters in packs today, but in the late 90s they were among the most special pulls imaginable, some of which have remained non-existent in PSA 10 Gem Mint condition and were so intricate and cutting-edge — ha! — that they will most likely always will.

15443a_lg9. Just as the development of insert cards corresponded with Derek’s rookie years of 1992 to 1996, this distinct period of later 1990s inserts directly corresponds to the New York Yankees dynasty years of 1996 to 2000. Game-used and serial-numbered autograph cards, and even 1/1 cards, are now extremely common in today’s products, but in the late 90s they were new and exciting, as was the printing technology that had made them possible, and they remain among the most collected cards in the hobby. For Yankees fans and for those who collect The Captain, the appeal of collecting cards from these years is therefore twofold, since so many of the innovative cards from these years were groundbreaking, and since they also document one of the last real dynasties in the history of the game.

14455c_lg10. Finally, let’s not forget that Derek has played his entire 20-year career with the most successful franchise in all of sports history and with all of us watching as closely as New York City watches anything, and he’s done it all with class, integrity, and grace. For this reason, wherever the Yankees have traveled during his farewell season, millions of fans have stood in ovation, and thousands more have held signs saying “Thank You.” But thank you for what? For the memories? Sure. And for the championships? Yes, of course. But the thanks we owe Derek Jeter have as much if not more to do with those three little words — class, integrity, and grace — than with anything. I’m not even sure what those things are these days, but I know that I’ve seen them whenever I’ve watched Derek play, and for that I will always be grateful.

15530b_lgDerek’s retirement announcement earlier this year took many of us by surprise, but it was in reality the ultimate classy act. Knowing that this would be his last season has helped him to pace and to preserve himself, and I’d certainly rather watch him with the knowledge of his retirement than to see him slowly decline over the next several seasons, even if those additional years could have brought him greater personal achievements, namely, the all-time hits record. But Derek doesn’t play for personal records, and he never has. He plays for wins, and that’s how he’ll be remembered. Although there were others before him and there will be many more to follow, years and years from now, he’ll be remembered best by his most common nickname: The Captain.

To consign your Derek Jeter and other New York Yankees items to Small Traditions November Holiday Auction, and to learn about the company’s popular Cost-Free Grading and Collection Management Services, please call 303.832.1975 or write info@smalltraditions.com, and be sure to follow the company on Facebook and on Twitter for more updates.

Big Results in Small Traditions Exclusive 100-Lot April Premium Auction

2Small Traditions LLC recently concluded its Exclusive 100-Lot April Premium Auction, setting several industry-wide sales records and reaching new milestones for the Denver-based auction firm. Despite its compact size, the auction closed at nearly a quarter million dollars, a new high for Small Traditions, which conducts monthly no-reserve auctions at its website, with every fourth month’s auction limited to just 100-200 premium lots. Each item in the premium auctions must have a minimum value of approximately $1,000, and the company strives to present each of these higher-end lots with a thoughtful and interactive description that links to hobby resources like PSACardFacts and BaseballCardPedia, and to player statistics, video highlights, and more — an engaging and information-rich approach that is at the core of the Small Traditions experience.

“The Premium format allows all lots to share in the spotlight, and 3the limited selection really encourages bidder competition,” says Small Traditions founder, Dave Thorn, a former teacher and research and writing coordinator for a pair of larger auction companies at the forefront of the hobby. Those are nice side effects of a decision Thorn made, he admits, strictly to help pace him and his small team, who work almost round-the-clock to coordinate their much larger Monthly Masterpieces Plus Auctions, which average anywhere from 500 to 1,500 lots. “We needed to take a break, but we didn’t want to miss a month, so the limited format developed naturally.”

5In addition to some staggering prices realized for both vintage and modern sports cards, perhaps what was most surprising about the company’s April Premium auction was that at least half of all the cards sold had come to Small Traditions in raw, ungraded form. As a part of its cost-free consignment process, Small Traditions will pay up front to grade its customers’ cards, only charging for the grading services after the sale of the cards, pending their owners’ approval of the grading results. The fee for selling on Small Traditions is 0%, so there’s absolutely no out-of-pocket expense to its consignors.

“So much work goes into sorting and closely inspecting our 15customers’ cards to identify candidates for grading,” says Thorn, “and that’s just the start of what is really a very expensive and challenging process, as it should be. So many customers expect high grades for their cards because they’ve been carefully preserved, but most don’t understand how rare Mint or Gem Mint cards from the 50s, 60s and 70s really are, how the perfect ones, even in many products from later years in the 80s and the 90s, are extreme statistical anomalies.”

That’s when the former teacher in Thorn steps in, as he works to ensure that every Small Traditions consignor understands not just the process of grading, but the stringent standards involved and the many challenges submitters face. The end result 9is that the grading process increases the value of the consignors’ cards, it increases the company’s profit from the flat 15% buyers premium it charges, and it brings some “great new-old cards” back into the hobby, a win-win-win for everyone involved.

“Great new-old cards” might be an understatement. Check out the following highlights from Small Traditions’ Exclusive 100-Lot April Premium Auction, which will be view-able at the company’s website until it begins its next auction on May 21st (consignment deadline Friday May 16th) . You can always search all of Small Traditions ended items, however, through the company’s user friendly results section, where you can reverse sort up to 5,000 items to see the top selling material in any search category. Small Traditions is also very active in social media and conducts compelling giveaways through both its Facebook page and its Twitter account, where it has awarded tens of thousands of dollars in giveaways since starting its monthly auctions just two years ago, all for free. Just “like” and/or “follow” today in order to play. 

  • 1996 Select Certified Mirror Gold Derek Jeter SGC 96 — $16,995 RECORD
  • 1980 Charlotte O’s Police Issue Cal Ripken Jr. RC PSA 4 — $11,721 RECORD
  • 1964 Topps #541 Braves Rookies Phil Niekro RC PSA 10 — $9,670 RECORD
  • 1987 Fleer #57 Michael Jordan RC PSA 10 — $9,963
  • 1979 O-Pee-Chee #18 Wayne Gretzky RC PSA 9 — $8,791
  • 2000 Bowman Chrome #340 Albert Pujols RC BGS 9.5 — $7,033
  • 1971 Topps #5 Thurman Munson All Star Rookie BGS 9.5 — $5,568 RECORD
  • 1990 Topps #USA1 George Bush White House Issue BGS 8 — $5,568
  • 1992 Little Sun High School Signatures Derek Jeter RC PSA 10 — $5,275
  • 1952 Topps #311 Mickey Mantle SGC Authentic — $4,982
  • 1993 SP Foil #279 Derek Jeter RC BGS/BVG 9.5 — $4,396 RECORD
  • 1954 Topps #8 Gordie Howe PSA 8 — $3,810
  • 1954 Bowman #66 Ted Williams PSA 8 (OC) — $3,517 RECORD
  • 1998 Fleer SI Extra Edition 1 of 1 #64 Derek Jeter PSA Authentic — $2,462
  • 1996 Select Certified Mirror Blue #100 Derek Jeter PSA 10 — $2,228 RECORD
  • 1986 Houston Astros Miller Light Nolan Ryan PSA 10 — $1,408 RECORD
  • 1951 Connie Mack’s All Stars #8 Christy Mathewson PSA 5.5 — $1,056 RECORD

Dave Thorn and his team extend their thanks to the countless collectors both past and present whose passions have made a place for Small Traditions to exist, with special thanks to the company’s growing list of consignors and bidders, without whom its monthly auctions wouldn’t exist, as well as to its many fans on Facebook and followers on Twitter.

Consignments Wanted for Multiple Summer Auctions

Small Traditions is currently seeking consignments for its next three Monthly Masterpieces Plus Auctions as well as its Exclusive 100-Lot August Premium Auction and its Exclusive Derek Jeter September Farewell Auction. Please write info@smalltraditions.com or call 303.832.1975 for more information and to reserve premium space for your collectible treasures today.

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Small Traditions Delivers Big Results In Monthly Masterpieces Plus #11 Auction

August 7, 2013

6061a_lgDenver-based auction firm, Small Traditions LLC, successfully concluded its 11th consecutive Monthly Masterpieces Plus auction late Saturday night from the 38th Annual National Sports Collectors Convention in Chicago, and the results were big. “Our favorite motto is ‘Small Traditions, Big Results,'” said company founder, Dave Thorn, a former teacher and research writer for catalog auction companies like Mile High and Goodwin and Co. “We say it often, usually to motivate us through the long days and nights that go into preparing each of our auctions, but it’s encouraging to see so many of our realized prices standing behind those words.”

After concluding the company’s largest-ever auction in June, consisting of nearly 1,200 lots and 10,000 bids, and then preparing6072a_lg free consignor graded card submissions for last week’s National in Chicago and also next week’s East Coast National in New York, the company faced a serious challenge in pulling off its Monthly Masterpieces Plus #11. Thorn admitted that he had reservations about conducting the auction from Chicago on the last night of The National, the country’s largest and most attended sports collectibles show. However, the gamble appears to have paid off. The hobby’s newest and fastest growing auction company realized exceptionally strong results for the popular products around which it appears to have generated a niche, including graded rookie cards, autographs, oddball items, and, most notably, Derek Jeter cards.

5928a_lgA 2002 Bowman Chrome Joe Mauer Gold Refractor Autograph BGS 9 RC Rookie Card sold for $1,367, and a 1967 Dexter Press Roberto Clemente PSA 9 card sold for $1,242. A 1990 Leaf Frank Thomas Rookie Card and a 1991 Bowman Chipper Jones Rookie Card, both graded BGS 10 Pristine for their respective consignors at no cost, each sold for $846, strong prices for items from the so-called junk era of the early 1990s. But that’s nothing new for Small Traditions, one of the hobby’s leading sellers of ultra high-grade cards from the modern period, that is, the 1980s through today. A quick search of the company’s Results for these years from its first eleven auctions displays extraordinary price tags, and yet Small Traditions continues to also realize premium prices for high-grade cards from the 50s and 60s, such as these 1951 Topps Team Cards and 1955 Topps PSA Mint 9s from its recent auction.

The most impressive sales, however, came from the Derek Jeter market. Despite the Yankee Captain’s inactivity this season, demand for Derek’s collectibles has remained strong, a good indicator that demand will be even stronger when the 39 year old returns to play. According to Thorn, “Jeter has entered that rarefied air of sport nobility, with other world famous players like Michael Jordan and Mickey Mantle and Babe Ruth, in which demand for his collectibles will always be strong, always rising. Even if Jeter never played another game,” continued Thorn, “he’ll be remembered as one of the most accomplished and beloved players, ever, and those heavily invested in his collectibles should expect serious spikes in demand when Jeter retires and then again when he enters the Hall of Fame. But for now, I think most fans are hoping Jete can teach himself to stop playing like a 20-year old and tough out another 3 or 4 years of play, taking aim at becoming baseball’s third-ever player to join the 4,000 hit club, behind Ty Cobb and Pete Rose.”

5728a_lgWhile a 1996 Select Certified Blue Parallel Pop 2 PSA 10 RC brought in $1,655 in Thorn’s most recent auction, and a handful of other rookie cards topped $1,000 in bids, what was most surprising about many of the Jeter sales from Small Traditions Monthly Masterpieces Plus #11 auction was that some of the strongest prices came from non-rookie card material. Among many other record prices, a 1997 Topps Gallery Peter Max Autograph Insert Pop 1 PSA 10 sold for $3,554, a 1997 Pinnacle Certified Mirror Gold PSA 9 sold for $1,504, a 1999 Skybox Molten Metal Titanium Fusion Pop 2 PSA 10 earned $1,242, and a 1999 Fleer Brilliants Gold Pop 1 PSA 10 brought $1,129. Thorn attributes much of his company’s success in the Jeter market to the strong core of Jeter collectors in his rapidly growing customer base and to the work he puts into JeterCards.com, but the math behind the big sales is pretty basic as well. The latter three cards listed above, for example, were produced in extremely limited print runs of just 40, 30, 50, and 99 total copies made, respectively, and Michael Jordan cards from some of the same brands and low-numbered insert sets from the late 1990s have been consistently selling for $5,000 to even $10,000 for years.

5710a_lg“I’ve been encouraging my Jeter customers to learn more about the late 1990s insert market because, just like the Jordan market, I think that’s where we’ll see the strongest numbers in the future.” According to Thorn, there are only so many Jeter rookie cards—about 330 different ones, to be more specific—and late 90s insert cards number in the 1,000s and encompass the Yankees so-called dynasty years of 1996 to 2000, and they’re also some of the rarest and prettiest cards ever made. “It’s the perfect storm,” says Thorn. “Younger collectors might not think anything special of cards numbered to 50 or 100, since you can pull one from just about every single wax pack these days, but it was a different story in the 1990s, when the manufacturers first developed the concept.

5881a_lgThe problem is,” continued Thorn, “this is also the period when baseball cards, a very simple collectible until that time, became incredibly confusing, with multiple parallels and various tiers of print runs, some as low as 20, 10, 5, even 1.” Thorn insists that for all the quality cards from the late 1990s in the market, there are 1,000 times more junk cards that scrupulous dealers will try to push on uninformed customers. “It happens every day on eBay,” he says. “Just because a card is a Pop 3 PSA 10, for now, doesn’t mean it is necessarily rare. More likely, the card is just so common and insignificant that no one has graded very many. So some sellers will try to charge $300 for a card like this, when any Joe could easily buy 30 raw copies and grade 20 of them Gem Mint, all for the same price.”

5884a_lgAs such, Thorn stresses caution and knowledge when shopping for late 1990s Jeter cards, and he encourages collectors to learn as much as possible before clicking the Buy-It-Now button on eBay. “I hate to see collectors I know paying absurd prices for common cards when they can purchase a PSA 10 card numbered to 100 in our no reserve auctions for the same price. In his final remarks, Thorn concluded that “the Jeter market is a true community. Most of the bigger Jeter collectors and dealers know each other, and most are very friendly and happy to share the information they’ve collected over the years. For most collectors, in fact, figuring out that information has been just as fun and challenging as collecting the actual cards. Got a question? All you have to do is ask. Start by contacting advanced collectors on the PSA Set Registry, try the Collectors Universe and Freedom Cardboard forums, or call or write Small Traditions. You’ll be glad you did.”

An alternative to eBay and to other high-priced auction services, Small Traditions conducts monthly internet auctions with $1 starting bids, no reserves, and free shipping on single graded card lots, whether you win one or 101 of them. Small Traditions also offers a 0% sellers fee for consignors plus free grading with PSA and BGS for cards valued over $100, and it is the only auction company in the hobby to offer both free selling and free grading services. Call 303.832.1975 or write info@smalltraditions.com to learn more and to see if your cards qualify. Currently, the company is aggressively seeking rare vintage and modern single graded card consignments for its August 31, September 28, and October (Nov. 2) auctions.

EXPLAIN IT TO ME: The 15 Minute Rule

A throwback to the earliest days of online auctions, the much maligned 15 Minute Rule is an automated method for ending an auction. It is the reason so many auctions last into the wee hours of the morning, and it is also the reason why some of the most coveted items in a given auction sometimes sell for multiple times their estimated values. At its simplest, the rule stipulates that the auction will not close until 15 minutes have passed with no bids being placed on any item within the entire auction. At that point, we assume, all bids are in, everyone has had a fair chance to bid, and so the proverbial gavel hits the sound block, the auction ends, and we all go to bed. I’ve been in the auction business for almost a decade now, and I’ve participated in hundreds if not thousands of auctions both as a buyer and as a consignor (or seller) and also as an auctioneer. On more than a few occasions, I’ve been kept awake until 4:00 AM to guarantee my winning bids. Other times I’ve set my alarm for 2:00 AM to enter my final bids, and still other times I’ve slept through an auction closing and completely missed my opportunity to bid. Today is the final day of Small Traditions Monthly Auction #6, and many of my customers have asked me to explain the 15 Minute Rule, so here’s an explanation of how the Small Traditions 15 Minute Rule works as well as a brief discussion of its pros and cons.

At Small Traditions, we’ve adopted the simplest version of the 15 Minute Rule. Our Monthly Auctions close on the final Thursday of every month at precisely 11:11 PM EST, at which time they enter into Extended Bidding. At that point, the 15 Minute Rule goes into effect, and each time a bid is placed within the auction, a new 15-minute timer begins to clock down to zero, and the auction will not close until a full fifteen minutes has passed with no bids being placed within the auction. IMPORTANT: All active Small Traditions bidders in good standing are permitted to bid on ANY item within the auction during the Extended Bidding period.

Of course, the primary reason we do this is simple: to generate more bids and to maximize prices for the lots within our auctions. For this reason, our consignors tend to love the 15 Minute Rule, while our bidders tend to hate it. The inevitable result of the rule is that most auctions last until 2:00 AM, 3:00 AM, or even 4:00 AM. But 4:00 AM where? 4:00 AM in New York is just 1:00 AM in Los Angeles, and while that’s still pretty late for a Thursday night, it’s just 10:00 PM in Hawaii and just 6:00 PM in Japan and Taiwan, where we have more than a few registered bidders. And so another primary reason we use the 15 Minute Rule is to give ALL bidders (east coast, west coast, far east cost) a fair chance to bid on the final night of our auctions.

The obvious complaint against the 15 Minute Rule is that it keeps bidders up too late, and several companies have developed alternatives to the rule to placate their bidders. Some auction houses apply the fifteen minute rule to multiple sessions within a single auction, while other houses apply the rule on a lot-by-lot basis, meaning that each lot closes individually after 15 minutes pass with no bidding activity. To the angst of consignors, a third alternative is to abandon the 15 Minute Rule and simply close the auction at an appointed time, but where’s the fun in that? In all sincerity, some of my fondest memories in this business have come on auction night, when bidding wars ensue and consignors realize record prices for items they were reluctant to sell, and when bargain-hunting bidders score incredible deals about which they brag to their friends the next day on chat forums across the internet.

A final note and a few suggestions regarding the 15 Minute Rule. Like all auction houses, Small Traditions reserves the right to use our discretion and to end our auctions at any time, especially when bids have slowed to a snail’s pace and the sky is paling. If you prefer not to stay awake until mid-morning, then consider setting your alarm for midnight, 1:00 AM, or 2:00 AM in order to check your status. The average ending time of our first have dozen auctions has been about 2:00 AM MST (Mountain Standard Time; we are in Denver). Alternatively, you can decide upon a price you are willing to pay for an item and use the Max Bid feature, available on all lots, or you can always call Small Traditions at 303.832.1975 and request a telephone bid up to a specific price before the auction ends. After all, more so than on other nights, on auction night, we work overtime.

Thanks for supporting Small Traditions, and good luck!

Dave Thorn

HOW TO: Submit Cards For Grading Part 1, Cleaning & Handling Your Cards

People often ask if Small Traditions has special arrangements or back door deals with PSA and BGS, two of the hobby’s leading grading firms. How else could we get so many PSA 10 Gem Mints and BGS 10 Pristines for our consignors every month? The answer to the first question is invariably no. PSA, or Professional Sports Authenticator, is a division of Collectors Universe, a relatively large company that is publicly traded on the Nasdaq stock market under the handle CLCT, and Beckett Media, home of Beckett Grading Services, or BGS, is an established publishing firm that has been in business for nearly 30 years. Ever see the magazine Victorian Homes at the supermarket? That’s them. Or how about Gun World or Diesel World or Drive? Yup, all products of Beckett. Although some casual collectors on the fringes of the hobby suspect the worst of authentication companies—and for good reason; the hobby has endured countless forgery scams and inquisitions by investigative journalists and even the FBI—to those who work closely with PSA and BGS, the idea that these two respected companies would ever engage in collusion or some other type of fraud is laughable.

The answer to the second question—how does Small Traditions get so many PSA 10 Gem Mints and BGS 10 Pristines—is almost just as simple. We sort millions upon millions of cards every year. Every day at Small Traditions, USPS, FedEX, and UPS deliver packages stuffed with old cards from our consignors, and we also buy product by the pallet load. We don’t crack wax boxes, we crack cases: set cases, vending cases, cello and wax cases, hundreds of cases every year. But anyone can accumulate cards. Indeed, every other house in every town in middle America has a stack of shoe boxes or white vaults or monster boxes somewhere in its attic or in the dusty recesses of its garage or cellar—please, get them OUT of the cellar; they should be in the attic, where it is dry. These boxes are mostly filled with worthless, overproduced trash from the 1980s and 1990s. But you know the old saying, one man’s trash is another man’s treasure? It’s true. Even the most worthless of cards from the so-called junk era can now fetch $10s if not $100s in top grades, and many insert cards from the 1990s are now selling for $1000s and even $10,000 and more.

So you’ve got some old cards. Who doesn’t? The hard part is figuring out what to do next. Sell them as is? Grade them? Give them away? Trash them? Or better yet, recycle them? This blog post is the first in a multi-part series about preparing your cards for professional grading. Even experienced hobbyists often assume that they can submit their cards “as is” to PSA and BGS (or SGC or ISA or GAI, there are more than a few grading companies in the market). However, these submitters couldn’t be further from the truth, and this is precisely the reason so many hobbyists are often disappointed with the results of professional grading.

In addition to using up to 10x magnification beneath bright white halogen light to examine every square millimeter of both surfaces and all four corners and edges of every card you submit for grading, it is important to learn how to handle cards by their edges so that the oil and dirt of your fingerprints don’t mark the cards. Unfortunately, many cards, especially newer, glossy cards, have already been mishandled, and even if the cards are perfect in every other way—centering, corners, edges, and print quality—they won’t grade higher than Mint 9 if their surfaces are marred with smudges and fingerprints. But who wants Mint 9s? We want Gem Mint 10s, right? So here’s a detailed 10-step prescription for cleaning and handling dirty cards in preparation for storage and/or professional grading. You’ll need a few things to get started, including penny sleeves and semi-rigid Card Savers from Cardboard Gold or Ultra Pro, lens cleansing cloths from your local camera shop, a damp sponge or paper towel, a bunch of a free time, and a whole lot of patience.

  1. Always wash your hands before handling your cards, and repeat as necessary when your fingers get sweaty, as they often will. It also helps to have a fan against which to dry your hands when they do get clammy. 1
  2. Work on a clean, smooth, and clutter-free surface. I often like to work on top of an over-sized top loader to ensure that there aren’t dust and other particles that might scratch the susceptible surfaces of newer cards.
  3. Holding your first card by its edges, the way you might hold a CD or DVD, examine first the reverse surface by tilting it under the reflection of your light.
  4. 2If you encounter smudges or other unidentifiable grime on the card’s reverse surface, lay the card face down on top of your clean surface.
  5. Using a plastic penny sleeve to hold the card in place, use your lens cloth to clean the area of the surface that is not covered by the penny sleeve. If the grime won’t fully disappear, then lightly touch your lens cloth to your dampened sponge or paper towel, and repeat. Wipe in the same direction, and wipe until you see no more smudges, only the perfect reflection of a clean and totally pristine surface.
  6. 3Flip the card around and place the penny sleeve over the surface area you just cleaned, and then repeat the same process as above. Take your time, and repeat as necessary.
  7. Once the back is perfectly clean, use the penny sleeve to help lift the card off of your surface so that you don’t smudge it again. Remember to hold the card only by its edges, and hold it lightly.
  8. Flip the card over and repeat the same cleaning process for the front surface. Be patient, and repeat until all smudges are gone. Understand that scratches won’t disappear, but this process can certainly help to lessen their impact. Please also understand that a dirty lens cloth will only continue to smudge the card. Even though they are expensive, you should replace them often.
  9. 4Using a penny sleeve to lift the card off your surface again, and holding it only by its edges, carefully insert the clean card into a fresh penny sleeve so as not to nick any of its corners. Now insert the penny sleeve-protected card into a semi-rigid Card Saver, and move on to your next card. Note: I like to put my finished cards into plastic bags so even the Card Savers stay fingerprint- and dust-free. Also, penny sleeves are not necessary for cards produced in the 1980s and earlier, and they can be both annoying and dangerous, but for the newer, glossier cards, they give graders something to grab onto when they pull the cards out of their semi-rigid holders, thereby preventing them from leaving their own fingerprints behind.
  10. Fill out a submission form from PSA or BGS, and then package up your cards per each company’s particular submission instructions. Address and insure your package, drop it into the mail, and then move on to your next round of orders. Don’t forget to stand up and stretch, go for for a walk, talk to a friend. Working with cards can be long, lonely, and laborious.  5

As you can see, preparing cards for professional grading is a very delicate process, but this is only a very small part of that process. What about cards that appear a little smaller than other cards? How can you be sure that these cards have “natural” edges and haven’t been trimmed or otherwise altered? Surely you don’t want to ruin your hard work of preparing your submissions by accidentally including “doctored” cards. And what about cards that appear to be dirty or smudged but that have already been graded? Can you regrade them? Can you remove them from their holders? Or what about cards that have a protective skin on their front surfaces? How the heck do you peel that thing off without ruining a corner or an edge? And finally, what about older cards that have wax on their front surfaces? Isn’t it possible to remove that wax without damaging the card? After all, if your 1960 Topps #350 Mickey Mantle card had a bugger stuck to its front surface, wouldn’t you just flick it off? Of course you would! 6

The controversy over so-called card doctoring is more relevant today than it has ever been, but at Small Traditions we draw the line at either adding or taking away anything that isn’t essential to the card. You cannot add extra color or gloss to a card’s surface. Neither can you trim or shave an edge or file a corner. Evidence of these sort of shady tactics is about as obvious to a professional as are the signs of an impending summer thunderstorm to a stadium full of baseball fans. If you’re buying raw cards off of eBay or from dealers at card shows and conventions, nothing can guarantee that all your cards will be clean and unaltered, and unfortunately, altered cards abound in raw, ungraded form. Neither PSA nor BGS will ban you from using their services if you occasionally submit a questionable card, but the same cannot be said if the activity becomes a trend. 7

To conclude on a more positive note, however, I’d like to briefly answer the final few questions proffered above. The answer to the issue of wax is remarkably simple and can be summed up in just two words: ladies pantyhose. That’s right. Or in one word: nylons, stockings, leggings, hosiery, call it what you want. But if8 you apply the same process as above and rub the surface of a wax-stained card with a small swatch of pantyhose instead of a lens cloth, the mesh fabric will lift and trap the wax as you go, leaving nothing but an ultra clean and polished and bugger-free surface in its wake. Just don’t let your wife of your girlfriend catch you stealing her favorite pair or, worse yet, shopping for your own!