Tag Archives: Derek Jeter

Ultra High-Grade 1951 Bowman Set Break, High-Grade HOF RCs & Scarce Oddballs & Inserts Highlight Small Traditions’ 4th Annual Holiday Premium Auction

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November 21, 2016 – Denver, CO. Widely considered one of the top-ten sports card sets ever produced, 1951 Bowman baseball is world famous for two simple reasons: Willie Mays and Mickey Mantle. In addition to Hall of Fame rookie cards of Whitey Ford, Nellie Fox, Monte Irvin, and others, the ’51 set contains the first-ever cardboard appearances of Willie and The Mick. For this reason alone, the set has enjoyed more popularity than almost every other post-war set produced after World War II.

However, the 1951 Bowman baseball set boasts several other virtues that have endeared it to collectors for two-thirds of the last century. With 324 cards comprising approximately 85% of Major League Baseball’s 400-player roster on Opening Day in 1951, it is the largest-ever baseball offering from the famed Philadelphia gum manufacturer. There are 27 total Hall of Famers, with key cards from Yogi Berra, Ted Williams, Duke Snider, and more. Last but not least, the set’s design consists of artistically enhanced color photographs that capture an almost palpable and transcendent timelessness as ably as the smell of fresh cut green grass, the taste of bubble gum, and the sights and sounds of the game itself.

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Denver-based auction firm Small Traditions LLC is pleased to kick off its 4th Annual Holiday Premium Auction with an ultra high-grade 1951 Bowman PSA-graded set break unlike almost any that have ever come to market. The offering consists of five of the 149 different 1951 Bowman cards to ever grade PSA 10 Gem Mint, 19 cards graded PSA 9 Mint, 27 cards graded PSA 8.5 NM-MT+, and over 100 other cards graded PSA 8 NM-MT, with stars and high-numbers offered as singles and low-number commons offered in four different groups of 20 cards each.

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In addition to a healthy selection of high-grade Hall of Fame rookie cards highlighted by a 1939 Play Ball Joe DiMaggio and Ted Williams pair graded PSA 7.5 and PSA 7, respectively, the auction also contains a fine selection of scarce regional and over-sized oddballs, foremost among them a 1960 L.A. Dodgers Team Issue of Sandy Koufax graded PSA 9 Mint, the single highest example ever graded, plus a Canadian-printed 1972 Pro Star Promotions Pete Rose graded PSA 10 Gem Mint, also ranking as the single highest ever graded.

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Operating in its fifth year of monthly auctions, Small Traditions LLC has garnered a reputation for seeking out and offering unusually challenging low population or “low pop” cards from its many consignors’ collections, and this month is no exception. Take, for example, the offered 1960 Topps #300 Hank Aaron card graded PSA 8 NM-MT, one of the most challenging Hank Aaron Topps cards in the hobby. Or how about the 1970 Topps #434 Johnny Bench card graded PSA 9 Mint, which is one of only nine in existence, or the hobby’s first-ever 1976 Hostess #33 Rod Carew graded PSA 10.The biggest surprise in the auction, however, might just turn out to be the 1980 Topps #230 Dave Winfield card graded PSA 10, the popular 1980 Topps set’s toughest Hall of Fame card, with only one other PSA 10 ever graded.

If you think you might have rarities like these hiding in your treasured collection, be sure to contact Small Traditions and to ask about the company’s popular Cost-Free Consignment Program, in which a representative of the company will work directly with you to identify candidates from your collection for consideration for professional third-party grading. Small Traditions will pay the expensive grading fees up front and then auction off your cards at a 0% sellers rate, the best deal in the hobby.

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Of course, the current month’s Holiday Premium Auction wouldn’t be a Small Traditions event if there weren’t an impressive selection of modern rookie and insert cards up for grabs, and this month’s selection does not disappoint. From Mario Lemiuex and Derek Jeter, to Michael Jordan and Kobe Bryant and LeBron James, there is something for every collector. Highlights here include a borderline Gem Mint 1985 O-Pee-Chee #9 Mario Lemieux RC graded PSA 9 Mint, a centered 1986 Fleer #86 Michael Jordan RC graded PSA 8.5 NM-MT+, an exceptional 1996 Leaf Signature Extended Century Marks Derek Jeter Autograph RC graded PSA 10 Gem Mint, a notoriously challenging 1996 Finest Refractor #74 Kobe Bryant RC graded BGS 9.5 Gem Mint, and a 2003 SP Signature LeBron James Autograph RC graded PSA 10 Gem Mint, among many, many others.

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Finally, the auction also contains a sampling of unopened cello and rack packs, a fine selection of signed baseballs, lithographs, and other memorabilia, plus a wide range complete and partial baseball and non-sport sets dating back to the early 1950s and culminating in the hobby’s largest ever offering of late 1970s Hostess cards, offered as partially graded sets, low pop and Pop 1 PSA 10 graded singles, and groups. If you are a Hostess collector, or thinking of becoming one, don’t miss this opportunity to add a significant number of high-grade cards to your new or existing sets from 1975 through 1979.

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Small Traditions LLC’s Spring Premium “Black Magic” Auction Presents The Joe Morrison Collection; Auction Preview & Consignments Wanted by 4/15

Important Note Regarding Consignments Wanted by 4/15: In addition to the items featured throughout this post, Small Traditions LLC is seeking a small selection of additional high-end items valued $1,000 and up for our 4th Annual Spring Premium Auction. The auction is already nearly full, so please don’t wait until the consignment deadline of April 15th, especially if you’d like to guarantee premium placement for your premium items, and especially if you’d like to take advantage of our Cost-Free Grading promotion. Call 303.832.1975 or write info@smalltraditions.com today.

March 23, 2016 – Denver, CO.  Like most athletes who played parts of their careers in the Empire State, Joe Morrison of the New York Football Giants earned his share of nicknames: Old Dependable, they called him, Mr. Versatility, Captain, Most Valuable Player, Mr. Wonderful even. After his playing career, he earned yet another name when he surprised the nation and coached the USC Gamecocks to the Gator Bowl, earning himself honors as the Walter Camp National College Football Coach of the Year. “The Man in Black,” they dubbed him in Columbia. And USC’s unforgettable season: “Black Magic.”

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“The Ultimate Team Player,” Giants owner Wellington Mara called him, Morrison didn’t just play part of his career in New York. He played all 14 seasons of it there. Drafted in 1959 out of Cincinnati, where he still holds most team passing and scoring records, the Lima, Ohio native played seven different positions in blue until his retirement in 1972. At the press conference in which he announced his retirement, then Giants head coach Alex Webster told the crowd that nobody would ever wear #40 for the Giants again, and so Old Dependable became the tenth player in team history to be honored by having his jersey retired.

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To this day, Morrison remains among the Giants’ team leaders in several categories:

  • 14 Years Played — 2nd
  • 184 Games Played — 5th
  • 65 Total Touch Downs — 3rd
  • 47 Receiving Touch Downs — 3rd
  • 395 Receptions — 3rd
  • 4,993 Receiving Yards — 4th

Some other statistics that can’t be found at Pro-Football-Reference.com include Morrison’s seven seasons named as team captain and his five team MVP awards. Even more impressive than his numbers, however, was the high esteem in which he was held by teammates, coaches, student players, community leaders, and fans. Indeed, long before other accomplished New York captains like Thurman Munson and Derek Jeter captured the hearts of the sporting world, there was Joe Morrison. Always there. Always dependable. Always respected.

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A testament to both his leadership and his knowledge of the game, Coach Joe Morrison was one of only a few major college head coaches to never serve as an assistant coach. In 1987, he earned further recognition as the Southern Independent Coach of the Year, and in 1988 he earned yet another honor with his selection as one of three head coaches to lead the East players in the College Football All Star Game at the Hula Bowl. A year later, after winning his 100th game at age 51, he tragically fell victim to congestive heart failure, leaving the USC community and the college football world in shock, and departing this world just as abruptly as he had seemed to storm it.

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Some notable names who played or coached under Joe Morrison include:

  • Charlie Weis
  • Al Groh
  • Robert Brooks
  • Sterling Sharpe
  • Harold Green
  • Brad Edwards

Small Traditions LLC is honored to have been selected to present the Joe Morrison Collection in our forthcoming April online event, from 4/17 to 4/30, which we have appropriately dubbed our Spring Premium “Black Magic” Auction. In addition to an impressive selection of high-grade sports cards and rare autographs, the auction will also include the following items from the estate of Coach Joe Morrison, several of which are previewed throughout this post:

  • Joe Morrison 1959 Rookie Year Game-Used New York Giants #40 Jersey
  • Joe Morrison 1958 College All Stars Full Uniform
  • 1959 New York Giants Eastern Division Champions Team Signed Football
  • Iconic Coach Joe Morrison Black Jacket Worn During Every Game
  • Joe Morrison Game-Worn 1984 Gator Bowl Sweater
  • Joe Morrison College Recruitment Letter Collection
  • Joe Morrison NY Giants Correspondence Collection w/ 1972 Contract
  • 1967 NFL Touchdown Club Most Valuable Player Award
  • 1985 Frank McGuires Award for Athletic Excellence
  • 1988 Commemorative 100th Win Sterling Silver Plate
  • 1987 Hand Written Letter From President George H. Bush

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Bid Now on 1,500 Lots in Small Traditions Massive Spring Training Oddballs & Autographs Auction w/ Spring Premium Sneak Peak

With 1,500 lots, Small Traditions LLC’s current Spring Training Oddballs & Autographs Auction is our biggest event yet. The auction is underway and closes on Saturday night, March 5th. There aren’t any five-figure Mickey Mantle or Willie Mays rookie cards — we’re saving those for our April Premium Auction, a sneak peak of which appears below — but up for grabs is a staggering number of graded cards from regional and oddball sets, plus wax boxes, autographs, rare game-worn patch, jersey, and bat cards, and other memorabilia.

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Navigate All 1,500 Lots with Just a Few Clicks of Your Mouse

The auction has been organized and interlinked to help bidders navigate all 1,500 lots with just a few clicks of their mouses. When programmed to display 100 lots per page, there are 15 catalog pages, each of which presents a hyperlinked and expandable category menu along its left side. Similarly, each individual lot listing presents a smaller group of hyperlinks related to that particular lot below its title. Simply click the hyperlinks to explore all 1,500 lots within the auction. Highlights from some of the more popular (and populous) categories include the following:

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Premium $1,000+ Items Wanted at 0% For Our Fourth Annual Spring Premium Auction

Please call 303.832.1975 or write info@smalltraditions.com today to consign your high-end collectibles to our 4th Annual Exclusive 100-Lot Spring Premium Auction. The auction is already filling up fast, so don’t wait until the consignment deadline of April 15th, especially if you’d like to guarantee premium placement for your premium items, and especially if you’d like to take advantage of our Cost-Free Grading program.

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Exceptionally Presentable 1951 Bowman Mickey Mantle Rookie Card

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Joe Morrison 1959 New York Giants Rookie Jersey

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Joe Morrison 1959 College All-Stars Jersey

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Immaculate 1959 Giants Team-Signed Eastern Division Champions Football

Collecting The Captain

10 Important Things To Know About Collecting Derek Jeter

14462a_lgby Dave Thorn

Dave Thorn is the founder of Small Traditions LLC, an online sports and Americana auction company that conducts monthly auctions in which selling is completely free and buyers pay the fees instead of sellers. This month’s Exclusive Derek Jeter September Farewell Auction features the key highlights from one of the most admired Derek Jeter collections in the hobby. With so many significant Jeter items coming to market this month, here are 10 important things to know about collecting Derek Jeter, especially for those who want to better understand his many different types of cards produced over the last 23 yeras — rookies, proofs, parallels, oddballs, inserts, autographs, Refractors, etc. — and which are the most valuable.

14480b_lg1. Derek Jeter has accomplished all of the following (see #s 2-10) without any remote suspicion of using Performance Enhancing Drugs. Quite the opposite, the mission of Jeter’s Turn 2 Foundation is to “motivate young people to turn away from drugs and alcohol and ‘TURN 2’ healthy lifestyles.” Just as his perennial postseason heroics in the late 90s helped baseball’s popularity to recover from the embarrassment of the strike-shortened 1994 season, Jeter’s consistently clean and classy style of play has helped to preserve the integrity of the National Pastime throughout its steroid era.

15395a_lg2. Some of his pinstripe predecessors might have won more World Series rings than Jeter’s 5 — Yogi has 10, DiMaggio 9, Mantle and Ruth both 7 — but Mr. November has more postseason batting records than any other player, not just in the Yankees’ books but in all of baseball history. Keeping in mind that baseball only played one round of playoffs until 1969 and that it now plays three, Jeter is the all-time postseason hitting leader in ten categories, including hits (200), runs (111), total bases (302), singles (143), doubles (32), triples (5), games played (158), at bats (650), and plate appearances (734). He ranks third in postseason home runs (20), fourth in postseason RBI (61), fifth in postseason walks (66), and sixth in postseason stolen bases (18). His postseason numbers represent an entire season’s worth of games, and a very good season at that. And for those who say hooey to postseason records, then consider that Derek is also one of just two players to ever accumulate 3,000 hits, 250 home runs, 300 stolen bases, and 1,200 RBI in the history of the game. The other player? Willie Mays.

15622a_lg3. Derek is one of just 28 players in baseball’s elite 3,000 hit club. He achieved his 3,000th hit on the biggest stage in baseball and with more pomp than any other player before him, hitting a home run off one of the best pitchers in baseball, going 5-5 on the day, and driving in the game’s winning run, a performance that will be remembered and replayed forever.

14501a_lg4. And the hits didn’t stop there. This summer, Derek passed the immortal Honus Wagner for most hits ever by a shortstop, and then he passed Adrian “Cap” Anson to earn the #6 spot on baseball’s all-time hits leaders list. Those who will remain ahead of him in the top five are Tris Speaker, Stan Musial, Hank Aaron, Ty Cobb, and Pete Rose. That’s not just good company he’s in; it’s the greatest ever. What is perhaps most remarkable about Jeter’s standing among these players, however, is that Speaker and Musial both played 22 seasons, Aaron played 23, and Cobb and Rose both played 24. Jeter, just 20. His way, and on his terms.

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5. In short, Derek Jeter is one of baseball’s all-time greats, and we’ve been more than lucky to watch his career. His famous “flip” play in the bottom of the seventh inning in Game 3 of the 2001 ALDS, his gutsy “dive” into the stands against the Red Sox, and his clutch hitting and never-ever-hesitating hustle will be highlights for the eternity of baseball. He stands in direct lineage to those who wore single-digit NY Yankee jerseys before him: 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, and 1. Like all these legends in pinstripes, Derek’s legacy will only continue to grow after he retires, bridging the generation gap as only baseball can do, as millions of fans face the existential question: will there really ever be another like him?

15758a_lg6. Drafted straight out of Kalamazoo Central High School and quickly becoming one of the most touted prospects in Yankee history, Derek can be found on 325 different baseball cards produced between his draft year of 1992 and his rookie season of 1996, and there is considerable debate about whether or not all of these cards should be considered rookie cards. His traditional rookie card year has always been 1993, but collecting has changed in recent years, and most collectors are now more inclined to pursue his many more challenging cards produced during his ROY-winning season of 1996, when we watched with wonder as the rookie helped lead the Yankees to their first World Series Championship in nearly two decades, than to collect only his cards from 1993, when he batted .295 in his first full season of Single A, still three seasons away from his official MLB rookie season.

15335a_lg7. Jeter’s rookie years of 1992 to 1996 correspond to the hobby development of insert or “chase” cards — special, limited edition cards randomly inserted into packs, many of which were super-short-printed variations, or parallel versions, of a player’s regular or base card — and his rookie season of 1996 would be the first year that saw products with significantly more than the two basic tiers of print runs that had thus far characterized the insert card development of the early to mid 1990s. Instead of products with just a regularly issued card and a single parallel insert of that regular issue — like Finest Refractors, Topps Gold, and Upper Deck Electric Diamond, for example — there were now products by Bowman, Leaf, and Select Certified that had as many as a half dozen different parallels, each one produced in smaller quantities than the last, some with print runs as small as just 30. Scarcer than even the T206 Wagner, cards like the famous 1996 Select Certified Mirror Gold are also some of the most beautiful cards ever made. Their development happened during Derek’s rookie season, which makes collecting his rookie season cards that much more challenging and fun.15619a_lg

8. If 1992-1996 is the birth of modern insert cards, then 1997-1999 is their renaissance or golden age. During the late ’90s, modern card manufacturers developed several more innovations that now, two decades later, still dominate the industry. These innovations included game-used cards, serial-numbered cards, and the development of the ever coveted 1/1 or one-of-one masterpiece cards, when manufacturers produced an ultimate parallel of a particular card limited to just one single copy made. Finally, let’s also not forget the incredible die-cut cards developed during the period, which may be common encounters in packs today, but in the late 90s they were among the most special pulls imaginable, some of which have remained non-existent in PSA 10 Gem Mint condition and were so intricate and cutting-edge — ha! — that they will most likely always will.

15443a_lg9. Just as the development of insert cards corresponded with Derek’s rookie years of 1992 to 1996, this distinct period of later 1990s inserts directly corresponds to the New York Yankees dynasty years of 1996 to 2000. Game-used and serial-numbered autograph cards, and even 1/1 cards, are now extremely common in today’s products, but in the late 90s they were new and exciting, as was the printing technology that had made them possible, and they remain among the most collected cards in the hobby. For Yankees fans and for those who collect The Captain, the appeal of collecting cards from these years is therefore twofold, since so many of the innovative cards from these years were groundbreaking, and since they also document one of the last real dynasties in the history of the game.

14455c_lg10. Finally, let’s not forget that Derek has played his entire 20-year career with the most successful franchise in all of sports history and with all of us watching as closely as New York City watches anything, and he’s done it all with class, integrity, and grace. For this reason, wherever the Yankees have traveled during his farewell season, millions of fans have stood in ovation, and thousands more have held signs saying “Thank You.” But thank you for what? For the memories? Sure. And for the championships? Yes, of course. But the thanks we owe Derek Jeter have as much if not more to do with those three little words — class, integrity, and grace — than with anything. I’m not even sure what those things are these days, but I know that I’ve seen them whenever I’ve watched Derek play, and for that I will always be grateful.

15530b_lgDerek’s retirement announcement earlier this year took many of us by surprise, but it was in reality the ultimate classy act. Knowing that this would be his last season has helped him to pace and to preserve himself, and I’d certainly rather watch him with the knowledge of his retirement than to see him slowly decline over the next several seasons, even if those additional years could have brought him greater personal achievements, namely, the all-time hits record. But Derek doesn’t play for personal records, and he never has. He plays for wins, and that’s how he’ll be remembered. Although there were others before him and there will be many more to follow, years and years from now, he’ll be remembered best by his most common nickname: The Captain.

To consign your Derek Jeter and other New York Yankees items to Small Traditions November Holiday Auction, and to learn about the company’s popular Cost-Free Grading and Collection Management Services, please call 303.832.1975 or write info@smalltraditions.com, and be sure to follow the company on Facebook and on Twitter for more updates.

Big Results in Small Traditions Exclusive 100-Lot April Premium Auction

2Small Traditions LLC recently concluded its Exclusive 100-Lot April Premium Auction, setting several industry-wide sales records and reaching new milestones for the Denver-based auction firm. Despite its compact size, the auction closed at nearly a quarter million dollars, a new high for Small Traditions, which conducts monthly no-reserve auctions at its website, with every fourth month’s auction limited to just 100-200 premium lots. Each item in the premium auctions must have a minimum value of approximately $1,000, and the company strives to present each of these higher-end lots with a thoughtful and interactive description that links to hobby resources like PSACardFacts and BaseballCardPedia, and to player statistics, video highlights, and more — an engaging and information-rich approach that is at the core of the Small Traditions experience.

“The Premium format allows all lots to share in the spotlight, and 3the limited selection really encourages bidder competition,” says Small Traditions founder, Dave Thorn, a former teacher and research and writing coordinator for a pair of larger auction companies at the forefront of the hobby. Those are nice side effects of a decision Thorn made, he admits, strictly to help pace him and his small team, who work almost round-the-clock to coordinate their much larger Monthly Masterpieces Plus Auctions, which average anywhere from 500 to 1,500 lots. “We needed to take a break, but we didn’t want to miss a month, so the limited format developed naturally.”

5In addition to some staggering prices realized for both vintage and modern sports cards, perhaps what was most surprising about the company’s April Premium auction was that at least half of all the cards sold had come to Small Traditions in raw, ungraded form. As a part of its cost-free consignment process, Small Traditions will pay up front to grade its customers’ cards, only charging for the grading services after the sale of the cards, pending their owners’ approval of the grading results. The fee for selling on Small Traditions is 0%, so there’s absolutely no out-of-pocket expense to its consignors.

“So much work goes into sorting and closely inspecting our 15customers’ cards to identify candidates for grading,” says Thorn, “and that’s just the start of what is really a very expensive and challenging process, as it should be. So many customers expect high grades for their cards because they’ve been carefully preserved, but most don’t understand how rare Mint or Gem Mint cards from the 50s, 60s and 70s really are, how the perfect ones, even in many products from later years in the 80s and the 90s, are extreme statistical anomalies.”

That’s when the former teacher in Thorn steps in, as he works to ensure that every Small Traditions consignor understands not just the process of grading, but the stringent standards involved and the many challenges submitters face. The end result 9is that the grading process increases the value of the consignors’ cards, it increases the company’s profit from the flat 15% buyers premium it charges, and it brings some “great new-old cards” back into the hobby, a win-win-win for everyone involved.

“Great new-old cards” might be an understatement. Check out the following highlights from Small Traditions’ Exclusive 100-Lot April Premium Auction, which will be view-able at the company’s website until it begins its next auction on May 21st (consignment deadline Friday May 16th) . You can always search all of Small Traditions ended items, however, through the company’s user friendly results section, where you can reverse sort up to 5,000 items to see the top selling material in any search category. Small Traditions is also very active in social media and conducts compelling giveaways through both its Facebook page and its Twitter account, where it has awarded tens of thousands of dollars in giveaways since starting its monthly auctions just two years ago, all for free. Just “like” and/or “follow” today in order to play. 

  • 1996 Select Certified Mirror Gold Derek Jeter SGC 96 — $16,995 RECORD
  • 1980 Charlotte O’s Police Issue Cal Ripken Jr. RC PSA 4 — $11,721 RECORD
  • 1964 Topps #541 Braves Rookies Phil Niekro RC PSA 10 — $9,670 RECORD
  • 1987 Fleer #57 Michael Jordan RC PSA 10 — $9,963
  • 1979 O-Pee-Chee #18 Wayne Gretzky RC PSA 9 — $8,791
  • 2000 Bowman Chrome #340 Albert Pujols RC BGS 9.5 — $7,033
  • 1971 Topps #5 Thurman Munson All Star Rookie BGS 9.5 — $5,568 RECORD
  • 1990 Topps #USA1 George Bush White House Issue BGS 8 — $5,568
  • 1992 Little Sun High School Signatures Derek Jeter RC PSA 10 — $5,275
  • 1952 Topps #311 Mickey Mantle SGC Authentic — $4,982
  • 1993 SP Foil #279 Derek Jeter RC BGS/BVG 9.5 — $4,396 RECORD
  • 1954 Topps #8 Gordie Howe PSA 8 — $3,810
  • 1954 Bowman #66 Ted Williams PSA 8 (OC) — $3,517 RECORD
  • 1998 Fleer SI Extra Edition 1 of 1 #64 Derek Jeter PSA Authentic — $2,462
  • 1996 Select Certified Mirror Blue #100 Derek Jeter PSA 10 — $2,228 RECORD
  • 1986 Houston Astros Miller Light Nolan Ryan PSA 10 — $1,408 RECORD
  • 1951 Connie Mack’s All Stars #8 Christy Mathewson PSA 5.5 — $1,056 RECORD

Dave Thorn and his team extend their thanks to the countless collectors both past and present whose passions have made a place for Small Traditions to exist, with special thanks to the company’s growing list of consignors and bidders, without whom its monthly auctions wouldn’t exist, as well as to its many fans on Facebook and followers on Twitter.

Consignments Wanted for Multiple Summer Auctions

Small Traditions is currently seeking consignments for its next three Monthly Masterpieces Plus Auctions as well as its Exclusive 100-Lot August Premium Auction and its Exclusive Derek Jeter September Farewell Auction. Please write info@smalltraditions.com or call 303.832.1975 for more information and to reserve premium space for your collectible treasures today.

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Record-Breaking Results in Small Traditions Inaugural Premium Holiday Auction

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January 7, 2014 — Denver-based Auction firm Small Traditions LLC recently concluded its Inaugural Premium Holiday Auction on Saturday January 4th, and the results were nothing short of breath-taking, with record-setting prices realized for any cards produced after 1969 and graded PSA 9 Mint and PSA 7 NM. In addition to dozens of other staggering sales, a PSA 9 Mint 1996 Select Certified Mirror Gold #100 Derek Jeter Rookie Card, one of just thirty copies in existence, sold for a staggering $13,479, making it one of the most expensive PSA 9 Mint-graded baseball cards in the hobby, and a 1980 WBTV Charlotte O’s #16 Cal Ripken Jr. Rookie Card fetched a record $12,307.

ripken wbtv psa 7 frontAccording to vintagecardprices.com, only a handful of post-1950s baseball cards have ever realized higher prices in the grade of PSA 9 Mint than the rare Mirror Gold Derek Jeter, including the famous trio from the condition sensitive 1962 Topps set — Roger Maris at about $27,000, Sandy Koufax at about $15,000 (but once for as high as $66,000) and Mickey Mantle at $17,500 — plus a record-setting 1963 Topps Pete Rose Rookie Card at $14,044, a record-setting 1968 Topps Nolan Ryan Rookie Card at $15,986, and finally the infamous 1969 Topps Mickey White Name Variation, a Pop 4 in PSA 9 condition, which has fetched between $13,500 and $17,000 the few times it has surfaced over the last decade. That’s some pretty high-class company for baseball’s newest member of the elite 3,000-hit club.

Mantle7As for the record-breaking PSA 7 NM 1980 WBTV Cal Ripken Jr. rookie card, we have to go back to Mickey Mantle’s 1952 Topps high-number to find a more expensive card in the grade. One of the most famous baseball cards ever produced, a PSA 7 NM 1952 Topps Mickey Mantle runs anywhere between $26,000 and $42,000, with the highest prices paid for nicely centered copies. And before the The Mick’s iconic ’52 Topps card, we have to go all the back to the 1930s to a find a more expensive PSA 7 NM, with the scarce 1933 Goudey #106 Nap Lajoie card realizing about $35,000. Of course, Babe Ruth is also featured in the classic 1933 Goudey set, on four different cards in fact, but only two of those famous four Ruths command higher price tags than the 1980 WBTV Charlotte O’s Ripken RC in PSA 7 NM condition, including the 1933 Goudey #53 Babe Ruth yellow back, which runs anywhere from $14,000 to $26,000, and the 1933 Goudey #149 Babe Ruth red back, which costs about $13,000. The other two Ruths,  the #144 full body pose and #181 green back, average about $8,500 and $6,800 in PSA 7 NM condition, respectively.  And so baseball’s “Iron Man” continues to set records. 14995a_lg

In addition to these historical sales, a number of other significant hobby masterpieces also realized strong final prices in Small Traditions’ Inaugural Premium Holiday Auction. A 1979 Topps #18 Wayne Gretzky Blank Back Rookie Card graded BVG 9.5 Gem Mint led the pack at $12,983, while a BVG 9 Mint example of The Great One’s O-Pee-Chee rookie realized a near record at $5,275. The only 1968 Topps #5 NL Home Run Leaders card graded PSA 10 Gem Mint realized $3,810, while a 1983 O-Pee-Chee #83 Ryne Sandberg brought $1,290, and a pair of Bo Jackson 1987 McDag Auburn Tigers Greats cards fetched $2,931. One of the hobby’s finest 1984 Topps #63 John Elway RCs graded BGS 10 Pristine sold for $6,154, and a 1986 Fleer #57 Michael Jordan RC gretzky bgs 9.5 blank back frontshattered recent eBay sales figures for the card with a final price tag of $4,982. With its extremely detailed descriptions and high-resolution scans, that seemed to be the theme of Small Traditions’ most recent monthly auction, with strong prices and happy consignors across the board. Returning to Jeter and Ripken, a 1992 Little Sun Derek Jeter Autograph RC graded PSA 10 Gem Mint brought in $6,447, and a 1982 Fleer Test Cal Ripken Jr. RC graded PSA Authentic sold for $2,580, both records for public sales (a PSA 10 1992 Little Sun Jeter Autograph sold privately last summer for a whopping $15,000).

Top Sales from Small Traditions Inaugural December Premium Holiday Auction:

  • 1996 Select Certified Mirror Gold #100 Derek Jeter RC PSA 9 Mint   $13,479
  • 1980 WBTV Charlotte O’s #16 Cal Ripken Jr. RC PSA 7 NM                $12,307
  • 1979 Topps #18 Wayne Gretzky Blank Back RC BGS 9.5 Gem Mint   $12,893
  • 1992 Little Sun High School Autographs Derek Jeter RC PSA 10        $6,447
  • 1984 Topps #63 John Elway RC BGS 10 Pristine                                 $6,154
  • 1979 O-Pee-Chee #18 Wayne Gretzky RC BGS 9 Mint                        $5,275
  • 1986 Fleer #57 Michael Jordan RC BGS 9.5 Gem Mint                       $4,982
  • 1996 Topps Chrome Refractors #138 Kobe Bryant RC BGS 9.5         $4,982
  • 1968 Topps #5 NL Home Run Leaders PSA 10 Gem Mint                   $3,810
  • 1951 Bowman #253 Mickey Mantle RC PSA 4 VG-EX                          $3,224
  • 1996 Leaf Signature Extended Century Marks Derek Jeter PSA 10    $2,814
  • 1986 Fleer Stickers #8 Michael Jordan RC PSA 10 Gem Mint             $2,697
  • 1997 Bowman’s Best Atomic Refractors Derek Jeter Auto PSA 10      $2,697
  • 2009 Bowman Sterling Gold Refs Mike Trout Auto RC BGS 10           $2,697
  • 1982 Fleer Test Issue Cal Ripken Jr. RC PSA Authentic                      $2,580
  • 1986 Topps #161 Jerry Rice RC BGS 9.5 Gem Mint                            $2,462
  • 1963 Topps #537 Pete Rose RC PSA 8 NM-MT                                   $2,228

1984 topps elway bgs 10 front   mj 9.5 rc bert front   rice bgs 9.5 front

18_8950b_lg   ripken psa front   jeter little sun deer psa 10 front

Free Grading with PSA and BGS on Items Valued Over $100

Unique within the industry, Small Traditions also offers free grading with PSA and BGS on cards valued above $100 and free authentication with PSA/DNA and JSA on autographs valued above $200. Most of the items in its Inaugural Premium Holiday Auction, in fact, were graded by Small Traditions at no cost to its consignors. The company is currently seeking consignments for its January, February and March Monthly Masterpieces Plus Auctions, and it will be returning to its exclusive 100-Lot Premium Auction format in April to mark the beginning of the 2014 MLB season. Please call 303.832.1975 or write info@smalltraditions.com for more information.

Small Traditions Celebrates One Year of Monthly Masterpieces Plus Auctions

August 26, 2013

3This month marks the one-year anniversary of Small Traditions’ Monthly Masterpieces Plus internet auctions, and the company couldn’t be more pleased with the engaging and unique mix of cards it is currently offering in its Monthly Masterpieces Plus #12 Auction, which accurately represents the direction in which its team is working hard to grow Small Traditions. The company made a splash last year when it established itself as one of the leading auction firms within the hobby to offer a significant selection of high quality modern cards outside of eBay, but over the ensuing months the company began offering a larger and larger selection of vintage cards, autographs, and other memorabilia, clearly evident in this month’s auction, which culminates this Saturday night, 8/31 at 11:11 PM EST at www.smalltraditions.com.

2According to Small Traditions founder, Dave Thorn, “One of my hardest tasks each month is to organize our auction in a way that engages our wide ranging user base, highlighting our masterpieces while still giving appropriate attention to all our consignors’ items. The harder an auction is to organize usually means the better the auction is, overall, and that was definitely the case this month.”

4Indeed, browsing the company’s auction in gallery format shows a compelling mix of cards quite unlike anything else you’ll find within the hobby. In typical Small Traditions fashion, the current auction begins with a handful of some of the most sought after Derek Jeter Rookie Cards in existence, including PSA 10 Gem Mint examples of the famous 1996 Mirror Blue and Mirror Red cards from The Captain’s ROY season of 1996, which were limited to just 45 and 90 copies produced, respectively, followed by a PSA 10 Gem Mint example of Derek’s 1996 Leaf Signature Autograph Rookie Card.  The auction then briefly turns to some high-grade vintage non-sport rarities from the 1965 Topps Battle and 1966 Batman sets before presenting some exceptionally high-grade, low pop masterpieces from late 1960s Topps baseball, including Pop 1 PSA 10 Gem Mint examples of Don Drysdale from the 1969 set, Big D’s last regular Topps card, as well as that season’s AL ROY, Lou Piniella, plus others. Up next are a handful of scarce modern rookie cards, including a seldom seen 1982 Fleer Cal Ripken Test Rookie Card, a pair of Michael Jordan Rookie Cards, a pair of rare Bo Jackson Auburn Greats Rookie Cards, and then some of the hobby’s rarest Ken Griffey Jr. and Frank Thomas Rookie Cards.

6After another round of exceptionally low pop Derek Jeter rookie card proofs and parallels, which include a PSA 10 Gem Mint example of Jeter’s 1993 Classic Best Autograph, the Captain’s only signed card from his traditional rookie card year of 1993, the auction then turns back the clock to offer presentable upper grade examples from early Bowman and Leaf sets, with high-grade copies of Jackie Robinson, Roy Campanella, Warren Spahn, Ted Williams, Mickey Mantle, and more. After a 1958 Topps complete set, the auction then takes an interesting turn to the frozen pond with one of the hobby’s highest grade cards from the 1953-54 Parkhurst set followed by a unique selection of Rick Nash Rookie Cards and Game-Used Autographs.

5The auction then takes yet another turn back to Derek Jeter, with an alluring selection of late 1990s inserts, which are then followed by a lengthy list of early 50s Topps and Bowman cards from the likes of Mickey Mantle, Whitey Ford, and Yogi Berra, before the presentation of a partial 1954 Topps high-grade set break, offered in single lots. More vintage card offerings follow, with many Mickey Mantle cards and other stars, before returning to a lengthy run of modern baseball cards, with many desirable high-grade rookie cards and refractors. Up next is a compelling mix of vintage and modern football cards, and then the auction returns to baseball with a healthy offering of presentable mid-grade examples from the popular 1954 Bowman, 1953 Topps, and 1952 Topps sets, before closing out with a colorful selection of print art and another round of high-grade vintage non-sport cards.

1An alternative to eBay and to other high-priced auction services, Small Traditions conducts monthly internet auctions with $1 starting bids, no reserves, and free shipping on single graded card lots, whether you win one or 101 of them. Small Traditions also offers a 0% sellers fee for consignors plus free grading with PSA and BGS on cards valued over $100, and it is the only auction company in the hobby to offer both free selling and free grading services. Call 303.832.1975 or write info@smalltraditions.com to learn more and to see if your cards qualify. Currently, the company is aggressively seeking rare vintage and modern single graded card consignments for its September 28 and October (Nov. 2) auctions.

EXPLAIN IT TO ME: Pop 1, Pop 2, Pop What? – Understanding The Set Registry Concept

9194a_lgIf you’ve ever searched eBay or our Monthly Auctions at Small Traditions, then you’ve no doubt encountered the term “Pop” in listing after listing of professionally graded sport and non-sport trading cards. The term is is an abbreviation for the word ‘population,’ and it refers to the total number of cards that exist in a particular grade for a particular card from a given grading company. The famous 1993 SP Foil #279 Derek Jeter Rookie Card, for example, is a Pop 10 in the PSA Gem Mint 10 category, meaning that only 10 examples of this card have ever achieved the top grade from PSA out of 10,240 submissions, which helps to explain why the last two public sales of “Captain Clutch’s” most coveted rookie card shattered expectations when they realized $19,999 in 2011 and then $24,450 in 2012. I write this reluctantly because just two years earlier I had sold two of these PSA 10s myself for what I thought were the respectable prices of $5,000 and $6,000. I was a teacher at the time, moonlighting as the head writer at another auction company, and I tell the story now only to illustrate how quickly prices can rise (and fall) in the sometimes cutthroat world of high-grade trading cards. Then again, I had only paid $6,000 for the pair just a few months earlier, so who was I to turn down the equivalent of nearly two months of my teaching salary?

Understanding the idea of a graded card’s population is key to understanding the graded card market and the reason why even common cards often sell for thousands of dollars. To be clear, a “grade” is a numerical value that a paid expert assigns to a collectible trading card after he has thoroughly examined it from every angle and determined that it is original and unaltered. Grades range from 1 to 10, with 1 being Poor and 10 being either Gem Mint or Pristine. Once the professional grader has determined a card’s grade, the card is then sealed inside a tamper proof plastic case along with a label (commonly called a “flip”) containing the card’s name, number, and year, as well as a unique serial number that allows the newly graded card to enter into a database with all other graded cards in order to determine how many total examples of that card (and all cards) have been graded and how many examples in each grade have been realized. These databases are called population reports, or “pop reports,” and they form the mathematical basis for the funky economics of the graded card market.

wagner psa 8So-called “low pop” cards are cards that are mathematically scarce in a given grade. A “Pop 1” is the only example in existence in its grade, a “Pop 2” is one of just two examples in existence in its grade, and so on. The world famous $2.8 million dollar T206 Honus Wagner card, for example, is a Pop 1 in the grade of PSA NM-MT 8, with none grading higher. Of the scant 33 examples of that card ever graded by PSA, it is the single highest graded specimen on record, with the next best copy residing several rungs down the grading ladder in the PSA Excellent 5 category. That copy is also a Pop 1 and is still worth over a million bucks. Heck, even copies in the PSA Good 2 grade are worth about $650,000, and there are ten of those on record, but the T206 Wagner story, which is still (in)famously playing out in headlines to this day, is for another post. An important point to take away from this example, however, is that, unlike the famous T206 Wagner card, once owned by “The Great One,” Wayne Gretzky, a card can be a Pop 1 in any grade other than PSA Gem Mint 10 and NOT be the finest example in existence. Suspicious sellers often proclaim that a card is a low pop card or a Pop 1 or Pop 2 in a certain grade, fully knowing that multiple examples of that card exist in higher grades, so unless that card is a PSA 10, you’ll want to look for the helpful clarification of “none graded higher.”

But let’s forget “The Flying Dutchman” and suspicious sellers for now. Before we can understand why so many common cards often fetch such hefty prices at auction, we must also understand the Set Registry concept, which is the second key to understanding the graded card market. Since graded cards have numerical values, a set of graded cards can be averaged together to determine that particular set’s overall grade point average, or GPA, just like academic grades in high school or college. A Set Registry, then, is a collection of graded cards that a particular collector has assembled and averaged together, either for the simple perfectionist’s pursuit of assembling the highest graded set possible, and/or for comparison against other collectors’ sets of the same cards, for bragging rights. Indeed, PSA’s Set Registry Leader Board and Annual Set Registry Awards and Set Registry Hall of Fame have spawned some famously fierce competitions over the years, and it is this competitive aspect of Set Registry collecting that drives prices through the stratosphere. I mean, why on earth would anyone ever pay $5,300 for a PSA 10 of Johnny Moore from the 1986 Fleer hoops set? And who forks over $1,214 for a common Checklist card from the 1984 Donruss set, or how about almost $13,000 for a PSA 9 copy of Virgil Stallcup from the 1951 Bowman set? Virgil WHO? Exactly. That’s roughly the same cost as a PSA 9 Whitey Ford rookie card or a PSA 7 Mickey Mantle rookie card, both from the same set, and both ranking as two of the most coveted rookie cards in the entire hobby, in any grade.

stallcupHere’s the point. If you take a quick look at the 1951 Bowman Set Registry Leader Board, you will see that of the 71 registered sets, the top two finest sets are separated by a mere three one-hundredths of a grade point. Mathematically, in terms of grade point average, this breaks down to the difference between a PSA 8 and PSA 9 or PSA 10 on just a couple of cards, and so when one of these leading set’s owners is able to either fend off the competition, or gain a little ground on the leader, with the purchase of Virgil Stallcup in PSA 9 condition, he pays big. Understand, however, that these are no ordinary collectors who currently command these award winning 1951 Bowman sets. These are two of the world’s most famous collectors, and they’ve been going head-to-head on the popular ’51 Bowman set for almost a decade. As you could probably guess, they are both well-resourced, and they are both men of exceptional character as well. Despite the price tags of the cards they collect, in dealing with them personally, I can attest that there remains a strong echo of their cherished childhood moments when they finally get what they want, flipping cards with their best friends in the schoolyard, or simply trading for players of their favorite team, and finally acquiring… Virgil Stallcup. 

The Set Registry concept is huge. Collectors can assemble Set Registries of virtually any composition that their curious minds can conceive, and if you think the competition for Set Registry domination over the 1951 Bowman Baseball issue is fierce, then just imagine the competition for the world’s finest Player Set Registries of legends like Babe Ruth, Shoeless Joe Jackson, Mickey Mantle, Michael Jordan, Walter Payton, Derek Jeter. Indeed, there are thousands upon thousands of different Set Registry possibilities: Team Sets from just one year, Team Sets from championship years, Master Team Sets from ALL years, Player Sets, Manufacturer Sets, Rookie Card Sets, Rookie Card Sets by decade, Hall of Fame Rookie Card Sets. The Bowman Baseball Master Set Registry of all Bowman Baseball Cards produced from 1948 to 1955. The 1952 Topps Master Set Registry, inclusive of all variations, Red Backs and Black Backs, as well as all error cards. Or maybe just the 1952 Topps Basic Set Registry. The All-Time Topps All Star Master Set Registry of every Topps All Star card ever produced. The Topps Tiffany Master Set Registry of all Topps Tiffany Baseball Cards produced between 1984 and 1991. You name it. As you can see, the possibilities are truly vast, and PSA also provides Set Registry tracking for graded event tickets, graded wax packs, and autographs, among other collectibles, as well as for graded coins under their PCGS brand (actually, PSA and PCGS are both brands of their parent company, Collectors Universe, which is a public company traded on the Nasdaq under the symbol CLCT).

Hopefully, this entry has helped to increase your understanding of the graded card market, but before I close, I want to clearly state my reason for explaining this information so carefully. I’ve been in the card business for a long time, as both a collector and a dealer, as a wax-pack cracking 8 year-old kid in the back of my Mom’s station wagon and as a professional writer, and now as the owner of Small Traditions. Like most people in the hobby, I’ve had some amazing experiences. I’ve handled Babe Ruth jerseys, I’ve made new discoveries, I’ve shared drinks with Joe Montana and Rickey Henderson, who spilled my martini on me. However, like most people in the hobby, I’ve also had my share of letdowns. I’ve purchased counterfeits and altered cards from crooks, I’ve been cheated and robbed, and Rickey Henderson never bought me a new martini. As a former educator, the thing I value most in the hobby is access to free and accurate information, and one of the things that bothers me most is when non-hobbyists seek out the advice of us experts, only to be swindled. I’ve seen it happen a thousand times. A recently retired 65 year-old gentleman walks into a card show with one of his life’s most cherished treasures, a shoe box full of 1951 Bowman baseball cards. He knows they are worth tens if not hundreds of thousands of dollars. There are multiple Mickey Mantle and Willie Mays rookie cards. There’s Whitey Ford. There’s “Teddy Ballgame” and Yogi Berra. He thinks he knows what he’s doing when he sells the box for $75,000 on the spot, cash, only, he never asks, and no one ever tells him about, you guessed it, Virgil Stallcup.

Thanks for reading. As PSA’s President, Joe Orlando, always says, don’t ever get cheated! Keep reading at blog.smalltraditions.com, and I promise, you never will get cheated, at least not for quality information.

Happy collecting,

Dave Thorn