Tag Archives: BGS 9.5 Gem Mint

Ultra High-Grade 1951 Bowman Set Break, High-Grade HOF RCs & Scarce Oddballs & Inserts Highlight Small Traditions’ 4th Annual Holiday Premium Auction

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November 21, 2016 – Denver, CO. Widely considered one of the top-ten sports card sets ever produced, 1951 Bowman baseball is world famous for two simple reasons: Willie Mays and Mickey Mantle. In addition to Hall of Fame rookie cards of Whitey Ford, Nellie Fox, Monte Irvin, and others, the ’51 set contains the first-ever cardboard appearances of Willie and The Mick. For this reason alone, the set has enjoyed more popularity than almost every other post-war set produced after World War II.

However, the 1951 Bowman baseball set boasts several other virtues that have endeared it to collectors for two-thirds of the last century. With 324 cards comprising approximately 85% of Major League Baseball’s 400-player roster on Opening Day in 1951, it is the largest-ever baseball offering from the famed Philadelphia gum manufacturer. There are 27 total Hall of Famers, with key cards from Yogi Berra, Ted Williams, Duke Snider, and more. Last but not least, the set’s design consists of artistically enhanced color photographs that capture an almost palpable and transcendent timelessness as ably as the smell of fresh cut green grass, the taste of bubble gum, and the sights and sounds of the game itself.

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Denver-based auction firm Small Traditions LLC is pleased to kick off its 4th Annual Holiday Premium Auction with an ultra high-grade 1951 Bowman PSA-graded set break unlike almost any that have ever come to market. The offering consists of five of the 149 different 1951 Bowman cards to ever grade PSA 10 Gem Mint, 19 cards graded PSA 9 Mint, 27 cards graded PSA 8.5 NM-MT+, and over 100 other cards graded PSA 8 NM-MT, with stars and high-numbers offered as singles and low-number commons offered in four different groups of 20 cards each.

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In addition to a healthy selection of high-grade Hall of Fame rookie cards highlighted by a 1939 Play Ball Joe DiMaggio and Ted Williams pair graded PSA 7.5 and PSA 7, respectively, the auction also contains a fine selection of scarce regional and over-sized oddballs, foremost among them a 1960 L.A. Dodgers Team Issue of Sandy Koufax graded PSA 9 Mint, the single highest example ever graded, plus a Canadian-printed 1972 Pro Star Promotions Pete Rose graded PSA 10 Gem Mint, also ranking as the single highest ever graded.

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Operating in its fifth year of monthly auctions, Small Traditions LLC has garnered a reputation for seeking out and offering unusually challenging low population or “low pop” cards from its many consignors’ collections, and this month is no exception. Take, for example, the offered 1960 Topps #300 Hank Aaron card graded PSA 8 NM-MT, one of the most challenging Hank Aaron Topps cards in the hobby. Or how about the 1970 Topps #434 Johnny Bench card graded PSA 9 Mint, which is one of only nine in existence, or the hobby’s first-ever 1976 Hostess #33 Rod Carew graded PSA 10.The biggest surprise in the auction, however, might just turn out to be the 1980 Topps #230 Dave Winfield card graded PSA 10, the popular 1980 Topps set’s toughest Hall of Fame card, with only one other PSA 10 ever graded.

If you think you might have rarities like these hiding in your treasured collection, be sure to contact Small Traditions and to ask about the company’s popular Cost-Free Consignment Program, in which a representative of the company will work directly with you to identify candidates from your collection for consideration for professional third-party grading. Small Traditions will pay the expensive grading fees up front and then auction off your cards at a 0% sellers rate, the best deal in the hobby.

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Of course, the current month’s Holiday Premium Auction wouldn’t be a Small Traditions event if there weren’t an impressive selection of modern rookie and insert cards up for grabs, and this month’s selection does not disappoint. From Mario Lemiuex and Derek Jeter, to Michael Jordan and Kobe Bryant and LeBron James, there is something for every collector. Highlights here include a borderline Gem Mint 1985 O-Pee-Chee #9 Mario Lemieux RC graded PSA 9 Mint, a centered 1986 Fleer #86 Michael Jordan RC graded PSA 8.5 NM-MT+, an exceptional 1996 Leaf Signature Extended Century Marks Derek Jeter Autograph RC graded PSA 10 Gem Mint, a notoriously challenging 1996 Finest Refractor #74 Kobe Bryant RC graded BGS 9.5 Gem Mint, and a 2003 SP Signature LeBron James Autograph RC graded PSA 10 Gem Mint, among many, many others.

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Finally, the auction also contains a sampling of unopened cello and rack packs, a fine selection of signed baseballs, lithographs, and other memorabilia, plus a wide range complete and partial baseball and non-sport sets dating back to the early 1950s and culminating in the hobby’s largest ever offering of late 1970s Hostess cards, offered as partially graded sets, low pop and Pop 1 PSA 10 graded singles, and groups. If you are a Hostess collector, or thinking of becoming one, don’t miss this opportunity to add a significant number of high-grade cards to your new or existing sets from 1975 through 1979.

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The Tucson Find: One of The Largest & Most Comprehensive Collections Ever Assembled Up For Auction

Beginning with our current Super Bowl 50 Auction, which ends this Saturday night, February the 6th, Small Traditions will be offering several thousand PSA-graded single cards and complete sets in binders from the historic Tucson Find this past summer. What exactly is the Tucson Find? Without exaggeration, the Tucson Find is among the largest, most comprehensive and impressive sports card collections ever assembled. The collection consists of nearly 4,000 binders, most of which contained multiple sets, complete with all inserts, errors and other variations, spanning all brands from all sports, dating from the 1940s through the early 2000s.

Not only is the Tucson Find remarkable for its breadth and inclusiveness, but the collection is noted for its meticulous attention to the condition of the hundreds of thousands of cards it contains. Even the cards from the 1940s and 1950s display immaculate, pack-fresh qualities, with particular attention to centering and to bold colors. In fact, the collection yielded the hobby’s second-ever 1953 Topps Mickey Mantle to grade PSA 10 Gem Mint at The National Sports Collectors Convention in Chicago this past summer, and every one of the 1,000s of single cards submitted by Small Traditions and being offered this winter has graded either PSA 10 Gem Mint or PSA 9 Mint, with ample opportunities for upgrades or crossovers to BGS 9.5 Gem Mint and BGS 10 Pristine.

Small Traditions is honored to have been selected to handle the modern portion of the Tucson Find, dating from 1980 through the early 2000s, and we are offering several thousand PSA-graded singles and complete sets still in binders in the following events:

Importantly, sets that contained key rookie cards of considerable value, such as the 1998 SP Authentic Football set, have been broken for grading and are not being offered in set form. An overwhelming number of complete sets, however, still offer an abundance of grading opportunities. Judging by the PSA 10 1953 Topps Mantle and the thousands of other cards graded PSA 9 Mint and PSA 10 Gem Mint, the offered sets are likewise in Mint to Gem Mint condition and boast considerable value, especially with their minimum bid prices of between $25 and $50.

If you have not already, register for Small Traditions monthly auctions here.

Learn how to grade and auction your cards and don’t spend a penny out-of-pocket.

Record-Breaking Results in Small Traditions Inaugural Premium Holiday Auction

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January 7, 2014 — Denver-based Auction firm Small Traditions LLC recently concluded its Inaugural Premium Holiday Auction on Saturday January 4th, and the results were nothing short of breath-taking, with record-setting prices realized for any cards produced after 1969 and graded PSA 9 Mint and PSA 7 NM. In addition to dozens of other staggering sales, a PSA 9 Mint 1996 Select Certified Mirror Gold #100 Derek Jeter Rookie Card, one of just thirty copies in existence, sold for a staggering $13,479, making it one of the most expensive PSA 9 Mint-graded baseball cards in the hobby, and a 1980 WBTV Charlotte O’s #16 Cal Ripken Jr. Rookie Card fetched a record $12,307.

ripken wbtv psa 7 frontAccording to vintagecardprices.com, only a handful of post-1950s baseball cards have ever realized higher prices in the grade of PSA 9 Mint than the rare Mirror Gold Derek Jeter, including the famous trio from the condition sensitive 1962 Topps set — Roger Maris at about $27,000, Sandy Koufax at about $15,000 (but once for as high as $66,000) and Mickey Mantle at $17,500 — plus a record-setting 1963 Topps Pete Rose Rookie Card at $14,044, a record-setting 1968 Topps Nolan Ryan Rookie Card at $15,986, and finally the infamous 1969 Topps Mickey White Name Variation, a Pop 4 in PSA 9 condition, which has fetched between $13,500 and $17,000 the few times it has surfaced over the last decade. That’s some pretty high-class company for baseball’s newest member of the elite 3,000-hit club.

Mantle7As for the record-breaking PSA 7 NM 1980 WBTV Cal Ripken Jr. rookie card, we have to go back to Mickey Mantle’s 1952 Topps high-number to find a more expensive card in the grade. One of the most famous baseball cards ever produced, a PSA 7 NM 1952 Topps Mickey Mantle runs anywhere between $26,000 and $42,000, with the highest prices paid for nicely centered copies. And before the The Mick’s iconic ’52 Topps card, we have to go all the back to the 1930s to a find a more expensive PSA 7 NM, with the scarce 1933 Goudey #106 Nap Lajoie card realizing about $35,000. Of course, Babe Ruth is also featured in the classic 1933 Goudey set, on four different cards in fact, but only two of those famous four Ruths command higher price tags than the 1980 WBTV Charlotte O’s Ripken RC in PSA 7 NM condition, including the 1933 Goudey #53 Babe Ruth yellow back, which runs anywhere from $14,000 to $26,000, and the 1933 Goudey #149 Babe Ruth red back, which costs about $13,000. The other two Ruths,  the #144 full body pose and #181 green back, average about $8,500 and $6,800 in PSA 7 NM condition, respectively.  And so baseball’s “Iron Man” continues to set records. 14995a_lg

In addition to these historical sales, a number of other significant hobby masterpieces also realized strong final prices in Small Traditions’ Inaugural Premium Holiday Auction. A 1979 Topps #18 Wayne Gretzky Blank Back Rookie Card graded BVG 9.5 Gem Mint led the pack at $12,983, while a BVG 9 Mint example of The Great One’s O-Pee-Chee rookie realized a near record at $5,275. The only 1968 Topps #5 NL Home Run Leaders card graded PSA 10 Gem Mint realized $3,810, while a 1983 O-Pee-Chee #83 Ryne Sandberg brought $1,290, and a pair of Bo Jackson 1987 McDag Auburn Tigers Greats cards fetched $2,931. One of the hobby’s finest 1984 Topps #63 John Elway RCs graded BGS 10 Pristine sold for $6,154, and a 1986 Fleer #57 Michael Jordan RC gretzky bgs 9.5 blank back frontshattered recent eBay sales figures for the card with a final price tag of $4,982. With its extremely detailed descriptions and high-resolution scans, that seemed to be the theme of Small Traditions’ most recent monthly auction, with strong prices and happy consignors across the board. Returning to Jeter and Ripken, a 1992 Little Sun Derek Jeter Autograph RC graded PSA 10 Gem Mint brought in $6,447, and a 1982 Fleer Test Cal Ripken Jr. RC graded PSA Authentic sold for $2,580, both records for public sales (a PSA 10 1992 Little Sun Jeter Autograph sold privately last summer for a whopping $15,000).

Top Sales from Small Traditions Inaugural December Premium Holiday Auction:

  • 1996 Select Certified Mirror Gold #100 Derek Jeter RC PSA 9 Mint   $13,479
  • 1980 WBTV Charlotte O’s #16 Cal Ripken Jr. RC PSA 7 NM                $12,307
  • 1979 Topps #18 Wayne Gretzky Blank Back RC BGS 9.5 Gem Mint   $12,893
  • 1992 Little Sun High School Autographs Derek Jeter RC PSA 10        $6,447
  • 1984 Topps #63 John Elway RC BGS 10 Pristine                                 $6,154
  • 1979 O-Pee-Chee #18 Wayne Gretzky RC BGS 9 Mint                        $5,275
  • 1986 Fleer #57 Michael Jordan RC BGS 9.5 Gem Mint                       $4,982
  • 1996 Topps Chrome Refractors #138 Kobe Bryant RC BGS 9.5         $4,982
  • 1968 Topps #5 NL Home Run Leaders PSA 10 Gem Mint                   $3,810
  • 1951 Bowman #253 Mickey Mantle RC PSA 4 VG-EX                          $3,224
  • 1996 Leaf Signature Extended Century Marks Derek Jeter PSA 10    $2,814
  • 1986 Fleer Stickers #8 Michael Jordan RC PSA 10 Gem Mint             $2,697
  • 1997 Bowman’s Best Atomic Refractors Derek Jeter Auto PSA 10      $2,697
  • 2009 Bowman Sterling Gold Refs Mike Trout Auto RC BGS 10           $2,697
  • 1982 Fleer Test Issue Cal Ripken Jr. RC PSA Authentic                      $2,580
  • 1986 Topps #161 Jerry Rice RC BGS 9.5 Gem Mint                            $2,462
  • 1963 Topps #537 Pete Rose RC PSA 8 NM-MT                                   $2,228

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Free Grading with PSA and BGS on Items Valued Over $100

Unique within the industry, Small Traditions also offers free grading with PSA and BGS on cards valued above $100 and free authentication with PSA/DNA and JSA on autographs valued above $200. Most of the items in its Inaugural Premium Holiday Auction, in fact, were graded by Small Traditions at no cost to its consignors. The company is currently seeking consignments for its January, February and March Monthly Masterpieces Plus Auctions, and it will be returning to its exclusive 100-Lot Premium Auction format in April to mark the beginning of the 2014 MLB season. Please call 303.832.1975 or write info@smalltraditions.com for more information.

EXPLAIN IT TO ME: BGS 10 Pristine

JordanrookieHow does a piece of cardboard printed less than 30 years ago and for a fraction of a single cent grow in value to $100,000 today? To those familiar with the curious world of high-grade sports collectibles, the answer is simple: BGS 10 Pristine. To those not in the know, however, the answer is a little more complicated. Non-hobbyists (or citizens, as we in the hobby sometimes call them) have a difficult time understanding why such a piece of cardboard is worth anything at all, let alone 100,000 bucks, and even many long-time dealers and collectors can’t adequately explain the strange economics of graded baseball (and other) cards. This article, however, is an attempt to do just that, to explain, to both collectors and non-collectors alike, the freakonomic nature of the high-grade sports card market.

BGS 10 Pristine is the toughest, most elusive, and most coveted professional third-party grade in the card collecting hobby. To be clear, a “grade” is a numerical value that a paid expert assigns to a collectible trading card after he has thoroughly examined it from every angle and determined that it is original and unaltered. Grades range from 1 to 10, with 1 being Poor and 10 being either Gem Mint or Pristine. Once the professional grader has determined a card’s grade, the card is then sealed inside a tamper proof plastic case along with a label (we call it a “flip“) containing the card’s name, number, and year, as well as a unique certification number that allows the newly graded card to enter a database with all other graded cards in order to track how many total examples have been graded and how many examples in each grade have been realized. These databases are called population reports, or “pop reports,” and they form the mathematical basis for the economics of the graded card market.

BGS 10 Pristine is the highest grade awarded by Beckett Grading Services, a division of Beckett Media, the same Dallas-based publishing firm that first began hawking price guides nearly 30 years ago in 1984. On their website, they describe the Pristine 10 grade as follows, “Centering: 50/50 all around on front. 60/40 or better on back. Corners: Perfect to the naked eye and Mint under magnification. Edges: Perfect to the naked eye and virtually free of flaws under magnification. Surface: No print spots. Flawless color, devoid of registration or focus imperfections. Perfect gloss, devoid of scratches and metallic print lines.” The BGS 10 Pristine grade is a full step above the BGS 9.5 Gem Mint grade, which Beckett describes as, “Centering: 50/50 one way, 55/45 the other on front. 60/40 or better on back. Corners: Mint to the naked eye, but slight imperfections allowed under magnification. Edges: Virtually Mint to the naked eye. A speck of wear is allowed under intense scrutiny. Surface: A few extremely minor print spots, detectable only under intense scrutiny. Deep color, devoid of registration or focus imperfections. Perfect gloss, devoid of scratches and metallic print lines.”

The BGS 9.5 Gem Mint grade is generally equivalent to the Gem Mint grades at Beckett’s two primary competitors, PSA and SGC, and what’s important to understand about the Gem Mint grade at any of these companies is that it does not indicate perfection. Take PSA’s standards for its Gem Mint 10 grade: “A PSA Gem Mint 10 card is a virtually [my emphasis] perfect card. Attributes include four perfectly sharp corners, sharp focus and full original gloss. A PSA Gem Mint 10 card must be free of staining of any kind, but an allowance may be made for a slight printing imperfection, if it doesn’t impair the overall appeal of the card. The image must be centered on the card within a tolerance not to exceed approximately 55/45 to 60/40 percent on the front and 75/25 percent on the reverse.” The point is that the standards for Gem Mint at both PSA and BGS allow for slight imperfections. Another important point to understand is that while there are dozens of other grading firms in the market, PSA, SGC, and BGS are the most trusted and most utilized; they are the big three. However, the standards at each firm DO differ, and much to the chagrin of far too many collectors, a card deemed Gem Mint by PSA might not necessarily grade Gem Mint by SGC or BGS, and vice versa. The primary difference between the firms, however, is that PSA’s grading scale tops out at Gem Mint, while the scales at both SGC and BGS top out at Pristine, a full notch above Gem Mint. So, what does that mean?

jordan psa 10Simply put, a BGS 10 Pristine is a perfect card, and it is far scarcer and far more valuable than a Gem Mint card from any grading company. Let’s look at the famous 1986 Fleer Michael Jordan Rookie Card (RC) as an example. A PSA 10 Gem Mint specimen is currently worth about $8,000 to $10,000. According to PSA’s free pop report for the 1986 Fleer Basketball issue, there are currently 155 PSA 10s of this iconic Jordan card in circulation from a sizable sample pool of 13,324 submissions to the Newport Beach-based grading firm, while estimates of the total print run for Fleer’s famous 1986 Basketball set range from 60,00 to 100,000 of each card in the short 132-card set, a small fraction of the print runs for most other products distributed in the 80s. One of our favorite websites, vintagecardprices.com, tracked 25 different sales of these PSA 10 Gem Mint Jordan RCs in 2012, with a high of $11,800 and a low of $7,000 and a mean average around $8,700. That’s a nice price for a so-called “modern card,” which we generally define as anything produced after 1980, but let us not forget that “His Heirness” was also the greatest and most popular player in the history of the hardwood.

The picture is much different at BGS. According to their population report, BGS has graded a total of 6,481 copies of Mike’s iconic Rookie Card and awarded 288 Gem Mint 9.5s, which sold last year for as high as $20,000 and as low as $3,483. Vintagecardprices.com was able to track 88 of these sales in 2012, with a mean average around $4,500. However, and we’re finally getting to the important point here, if you look at the BGS population report, which is also free but requires a log-in, you will notice that they have also graded four examples of the famed Jordan RC in the pinnacle Pristine 10 grade. There are no sales records for three of these fabled four Pristine 10 Jordan RCs, probably because they are locked away in safety deposit boxes somewhere, but the first one ever realized sold on eBay in August 2009 for a whopping $82,000, and that same card later sold in June 2011 for $100,000. Now that’s some serious coin for a card produced not 30 years ago.

Before concluding, let’s turn down the volume on the value dial and explore the impact that the BGS Pristine 10 grade has on cards of lesser significance than the Michael Jordan RC. Most dealers and collectors of this sort of ultra high-grade material would agree that the BGS 10 Pristine grade tends to increase the value of a BGS 9.5 Gem Mint or PSA 10 Gem Mint card by an average multiplier of anywhere from 5 to 10 times, if not significantly higher in certain cases. For many years, the mere sighting of a BGS 10 on eBay or at a card show was a rare phenomenon, but they are more abundant now as a result of increased production standards at contemporary card manufacturers—cards nowadays often emerge from packs in Gem Mint if not Pristine condition—and also the sheer volume of submissions to BGS. Small Traditions is one of the hobby’s leading sellers of BGS 10 Pristines, and there are always dozens available in our popular Monthly Auctions, which always start on the middle Wednesday of every month and end 15 days later on the final Thursday of every month. Click here to be taken directly to a list of BGS 10 Pristines selling in the current month’s auction, and click here if you’d like to register to bid. Here are just a few examples of the premium prices collectors pay for BGS 10 Pristines:

Card PSA 10 Sale Date BGS 10 Sale Date
1982 Fleer #603 Lee Smith RC $62 eBay Dec 27 $600 eBay Feb 11
1983 Fleer #179 Wade Boggs RC $36 eBay Jan 19 $355 STs Nov 2012
1985 Donruss #273 Roger Clemens $69 eBay Jan 10 $293 STs Nov 2012
1987 Donruss #502 David Cone RC $15 eBay Dec 06 $380 eBay Mar 18
1989 Topps #49 Craig Biggio RC $25 eBay Dec 27 $316 STs Oct 2012
1989 Topps #647 Randy Johnson RC $25 eBay Jan 10 $384 STs Oct 2012
1989 Upper Deck #1 Ken Griffey RC $240 eBay Jan 26 $1,249 eBay Oct 29
1990 Leaf #300 Frank Thomas RC $69 eBay Jan 10 $921 eBay Nov 21
1990 Topps #692 Sammy Sosa RC $10 eBay Jan 11 $261 STs Oct 2012
1996 Score #240 Derek Jeter RC $12 eBay Jan 09 $355 STs Nov 2012
1999 TSC Triumvirate Derek Jeter $36 eBay Nov 28 $575 STs Nov 2012
2011 BP #BP1 Bryce Harper RC $270 eBay Jan 19 $1,200 eBay Nov 29

In addition to creating higher prices, the BGS 10 Pristine grade has another impact on the hobby that is important to mention before concluding. As Beckett rolls out its online Set Registry system over the coming months, the BGS 10 Pristine grade will have a significant impact on Set Registry collections. As collectors scramble to assemble the highest-graded Registry of sets like 1952 Topps, 1984 Donruss, or 1986 Fleer Basketball, to name just a few, demand for even common players in the BGS 10 Pristine grade will increase. Moreover, when it comes to Player Set Registries, expect to see increased demand for players’ cards beyond their rookie years. For an informative read on the Set Registry idea, please my first Explain It To Me Post: Pop 1, Pop 2, Pop What? – Understanding The Set Registry Concept.

In answering a few important questions about the economics of the ultra high-grade card market, we’ve opened the door to several more questions, with which I will leave you here but hopefully return to answer in subsequent posts. First, how can the prices for a PSA 10 Jordan RC, or any other card in the same grade for that matter, range by nearly $5,000, and how can the prices for a BGS 9.5 or BGS 10 Jordan RC range by as much as $20,000? Second, who’s to say what’s Mint or Gem Mint or Pristine, especially when the answer can create $100,000 of value? After all, isn’t grading an essentially subjective process? Third, why doesn’t PSA have a Pristine or Perfect grade like other grading companies? And last, are there other cards that will approach six figures because of the Pristine 10 grade, and will there ever be a seven figure Pristine 10? Forget Honus Wagner and “Shoeless Joe” Jackson cards, will there ever be a million dollar modern card? Thanks to the BGS 10 Pristine grade, I’m confident that the answer is yes, but I won’t tell you exactly what that is right now, because I’m still out there looking for it.

Thanks for reading, and happy hunting,

Dave Thorn