Tag Archives: autographs

Ultra High-Grade 1951 Bowman Set Break, High-Grade HOF RCs & Scarce Oddballs & Inserts Highlight Small Traditions’ 4th Annual Holiday Premium Auction

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November 21, 2016 – Denver, CO. Widely considered one of the top-ten sports card sets ever produced, 1951 Bowman baseball is world famous for two simple reasons: Willie Mays and Mickey Mantle. In addition to Hall of Fame rookie cards of Whitey Ford, Nellie Fox, Monte Irvin, and others, the ’51 set contains the first-ever cardboard appearances of Willie and The Mick. For this reason alone, the set has enjoyed more popularity than almost every other post-war set produced after World War II.

However, the 1951 Bowman baseball set boasts several other virtues that have endeared it to collectors for two-thirds of the last century. With 324 cards comprising approximately 85% of Major League Baseball’s 400-player roster on Opening Day in 1951, it is the largest-ever baseball offering from the famed Philadelphia gum manufacturer. There are 27 total Hall of Famers, with key cards from Yogi Berra, Ted Williams, Duke Snider, and more. Last but not least, the set’s design consists of artistically enhanced color photographs that capture an almost palpable and transcendent timelessness as ably as the smell of fresh cut green grass, the taste of bubble gum, and the sights and sounds of the game itself.

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Denver-based auction firm Small Traditions LLC is pleased to kick off its 4th Annual Holiday Premium Auction with an ultra high-grade 1951 Bowman PSA-graded set break unlike almost any that have ever come to market. The offering consists of five of the 149 different 1951 Bowman cards to ever grade PSA 10 Gem Mint, 19 cards graded PSA 9 Mint, 27 cards graded PSA 8.5 NM-MT+, and over 100 other cards graded PSA 8 NM-MT, with stars and high-numbers offered as singles and low-number commons offered in four different groups of 20 cards each.

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In addition to a healthy selection of high-grade Hall of Fame rookie cards highlighted by a 1939 Play Ball Joe DiMaggio and Ted Williams pair graded PSA 7.5 and PSA 7, respectively, the auction also contains a fine selection of scarce regional and over-sized oddballs, foremost among them a 1960 L.A. Dodgers Team Issue of Sandy Koufax graded PSA 9 Mint, the single highest example ever graded, plus a Canadian-printed 1972 Pro Star Promotions Pete Rose graded PSA 10 Gem Mint, also ranking as the single highest ever graded.

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Operating in its fifth year of monthly auctions, Small Traditions LLC has garnered a reputation for seeking out and offering unusually challenging low population or “low pop” cards from its many consignors’ collections, and this month is no exception. Take, for example, the offered 1960 Topps #300 Hank Aaron card graded PSA 8 NM-MT, one of the most challenging Hank Aaron Topps cards in the hobby. Or how about the 1970 Topps #434 Johnny Bench card graded PSA 9 Mint, which is one of only nine in existence, or the hobby’s first-ever 1976 Hostess #33 Rod Carew graded PSA 10.The biggest surprise in the auction, however, might just turn out to be the 1980 Topps #230 Dave Winfield card graded PSA 10, the popular 1980 Topps set’s toughest Hall of Fame card, with only one other PSA 10 ever graded.

If you think you might have rarities like these hiding in your treasured collection, be sure to contact Small Traditions and to ask about the company’s popular Cost-Free Consignment Program, in which a representative of the company will work directly with you to identify candidates from your collection for consideration for professional third-party grading. Small Traditions will pay the expensive grading fees up front and then auction off your cards at a 0% sellers rate, the best deal in the hobby.

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Of course, the current month’s Holiday Premium Auction wouldn’t be a Small Traditions event if there weren’t an impressive selection of modern rookie and insert cards up for grabs, and this month’s selection does not disappoint. From Mario Lemiuex and Derek Jeter, to Michael Jordan and Kobe Bryant and LeBron James, there is something for every collector. Highlights here include a borderline Gem Mint 1985 O-Pee-Chee #9 Mario Lemieux RC graded PSA 9 Mint, a centered 1986 Fleer #86 Michael Jordan RC graded PSA 8.5 NM-MT+, an exceptional 1996 Leaf Signature Extended Century Marks Derek Jeter Autograph RC graded PSA 10 Gem Mint, a notoriously challenging 1996 Finest Refractor #74 Kobe Bryant RC graded BGS 9.5 Gem Mint, and a 2003 SP Signature LeBron James Autograph RC graded PSA 10 Gem Mint, among many, many others.

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Finally, the auction also contains a sampling of unopened cello and rack packs, a fine selection of signed baseballs, lithographs, and other memorabilia, plus a wide range complete and partial baseball and non-sport sets dating back to the early 1950s and culminating in the hobby’s largest ever offering of late 1970s Hostess cards, offered as partially graded sets, low pop and Pop 1 PSA 10 graded singles, and groups. If you are a Hostess collector, or thinking of becoming one, don’t miss this opportunity to add a significant number of high-grade cards to your new or existing sets from 1975 through 1979.

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Small Traditions LLC’s Spring Premium “Black Magic” Auction Presents The Joe Morrison Collection; Auction Preview & Consignments Wanted by 4/15

Important Note Regarding Consignments Wanted by 4/15: In addition to the items featured throughout this post, Small Traditions LLC is seeking a small selection of additional high-end items valued $1,000 and up for our 4th Annual Spring Premium Auction. The auction is already nearly full, so please don’t wait until the consignment deadline of April 15th, especially if you’d like to guarantee premium placement for your premium items, and especially if you’d like to take advantage of our Cost-Free Grading promotion. Call 303.832.1975 or write info@smalltraditions.com today.

March 23, 2016 – Denver, CO.  Like most athletes who played parts of their careers in the Empire State, Joe Morrison of the New York Football Giants earned his share of nicknames: Old Dependable, they called him, Mr. Versatility, Captain, Most Valuable Player, Mr. Wonderful even. After his playing career, he earned yet another name when he surprised the nation and coached the USC Gamecocks to the Gator Bowl, earning himself honors as the Walter Camp National College Football Coach of the Year. “The Man in Black,” they dubbed him in Columbia. And USC’s unforgettable season: “Black Magic.”

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“The Ultimate Team Player,” Giants owner Wellington Mara called him, Morrison didn’t just play part of his career in New York. He played all 14 seasons of it there. Drafted in 1959 out of Cincinnati, where he still holds most team passing and scoring records, the Lima, Ohio native played seven different positions in blue until his retirement in 1972. At the press conference in which he announced his retirement, then Giants head coach Alex Webster told the crowd that nobody would ever wear #40 for the Giants again, and so Old Dependable became the tenth player in team history to be honored by having his jersey retired.

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To this day, Morrison remains among the Giants’ team leaders in several categories:

  • 14 Years Played — 2nd
  • 184 Games Played — 5th
  • 65 Total Touch Downs — 3rd
  • 47 Receiving Touch Downs — 3rd
  • 395 Receptions — 3rd
  • 4,993 Receiving Yards — 4th

Some other statistics that can’t be found at Pro-Football-Reference.com include Morrison’s seven seasons named as team captain and his five team MVP awards. Even more impressive than his numbers, however, was the high esteem in which he was held by teammates, coaches, student players, community leaders, and fans. Indeed, long before other accomplished New York captains like Thurman Munson and Derek Jeter captured the hearts of the sporting world, there was Joe Morrison. Always there. Always dependable. Always respected.

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A testament to both his leadership and his knowledge of the game, Coach Joe Morrison was one of only a few major college head coaches to never serve as an assistant coach. In 1987, he earned further recognition as the Southern Independent Coach of the Year, and in 1988 he earned yet another honor with his selection as one of three head coaches to lead the East players in the College Football All Star Game at the Hula Bowl. A year later, after winning his 100th game at age 51, he tragically fell victim to congestive heart failure, leaving the USC community and the college football world in shock, and departing this world just as abruptly as he had seemed to storm it.

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Some notable names who played or coached under Joe Morrison include:

  • Charlie Weis
  • Al Groh
  • Robert Brooks
  • Sterling Sharpe
  • Harold Green
  • Brad Edwards

Small Traditions LLC is honored to have been selected to present the Joe Morrison Collection in our forthcoming April online event, from 4/17 to 4/30, which we have appropriately dubbed our Spring Premium “Black Magic” Auction. In addition to an impressive selection of high-grade sports cards and rare autographs, the auction will also include the following items from the estate of Coach Joe Morrison, several of which are previewed throughout this post:

  • Joe Morrison 1959 Rookie Year Game-Used New York Giants #40 Jersey
  • Joe Morrison 1958 College All Stars Full Uniform
  • 1959 New York Giants Eastern Division Champions Team Signed Football
  • Iconic Coach Joe Morrison Black Jacket Worn During Every Game
  • Joe Morrison Game-Worn 1984 Gator Bowl Sweater
  • Joe Morrison College Recruitment Letter Collection
  • Joe Morrison NY Giants Correspondence Collection w/ 1972 Contract
  • 1967 NFL Touchdown Club Most Valuable Player Award
  • 1985 Frank McGuires Award for Athletic Excellence
  • 1988 Commemorative 100th Win Sterling Silver Plate
  • 1987 Hand Written Letter From President George H. Bush

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Bid Now on 1,500 Lots in Small Traditions Massive Spring Training Oddballs & Autographs Auction w/ Spring Premium Sneak Peak

With 1,500 lots, Small Traditions LLC’s current Spring Training Oddballs & Autographs Auction is our biggest event yet. The auction is underway and closes on Saturday night, March 5th. There aren’t any five-figure Mickey Mantle or Willie Mays rookie cards — we’re saving those for our April Premium Auction, a sneak peak of which appears below — but up for grabs is a staggering number of graded cards from regional and oddball sets, plus wax boxes, autographs, rare game-worn patch, jersey, and bat cards, and other memorabilia.

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Navigate All 1,500 Lots with Just a Few Clicks of Your Mouse

The auction has been organized and interlinked to help bidders navigate all 1,500 lots with just a few clicks of their mouses. When programmed to display 100 lots per page, there are 15 catalog pages, each of which presents a hyperlinked and expandable category menu along its left side. Similarly, each individual lot listing presents a smaller group of hyperlinks related to that particular lot below its title. Simply click the hyperlinks to explore all 1,500 lots within the auction. Highlights from some of the more popular (and populous) categories include the following:

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Premium $1,000+ Items Wanted at 0% For Our Fourth Annual Spring Premium Auction

Please call 303.832.1975 or write info@smalltraditions.com today to consign your high-end collectibles to our 4th Annual Exclusive 100-Lot Spring Premium Auction. The auction is already filling up fast, so don’t wait until the consignment deadline of April 15th, especially if you’d like to guarantee premium placement for your premium items, and especially if you’d like to take advantage of our Cost-Free Grading program.

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Exceptionally Presentable 1951 Bowman Mickey Mantle Rookie Card

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Joe Morrison 1959 New York Giants Rookie Jersey

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Joe Morrison 1959 College All-Stars Jersey

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Immaculate 1959 Giants Team-Signed Eastern Division Champions Football

Collecting The Captain

10 Important Things To Know About Collecting Derek Jeter

14462a_lgby Dave Thorn

Dave Thorn is the founder of Small Traditions LLC, an online sports and Americana auction company that conducts monthly auctions in which selling is completely free and buyers pay the fees instead of sellers. This month’s Exclusive Derek Jeter September Farewell Auction features the key highlights from one of the most admired Derek Jeter collections in the hobby. With so many significant Jeter items coming to market this month, here are 10 important things to know about collecting Derek Jeter, especially for those who want to better understand his many different types of cards produced over the last 23 yeras — rookies, proofs, parallels, oddballs, inserts, autographs, Refractors, etc. — and which are the most valuable.

14480b_lg1. Derek Jeter has accomplished all of the following (see #s 2-10) without any remote suspicion of using Performance Enhancing Drugs. Quite the opposite, the mission of Jeter’s Turn 2 Foundation is to “motivate young people to turn away from drugs and alcohol and ‘TURN 2’ healthy lifestyles.” Just as his perennial postseason heroics in the late 90s helped baseball’s popularity to recover from the embarrassment of the strike-shortened 1994 season, Jeter’s consistently clean and classy style of play has helped to preserve the integrity of the National Pastime throughout its steroid era.

15395a_lg2. Some of his pinstripe predecessors might have won more World Series rings than Jeter’s 5 — Yogi has 10, DiMaggio 9, Mantle and Ruth both 7 — but Mr. November has more postseason batting records than any other player, not just in the Yankees’ books but in all of baseball history. Keeping in mind that baseball only played one round of playoffs until 1969 and that it now plays three, Jeter is the all-time postseason hitting leader in ten categories, including hits (200), runs (111), total bases (302), singles (143), doubles (32), triples (5), games played (158), at bats (650), and plate appearances (734). He ranks third in postseason home runs (20), fourth in postseason RBI (61), fifth in postseason walks (66), and sixth in postseason stolen bases (18). His postseason numbers represent an entire season’s worth of games, and a very good season at that. And for those who say hooey to postseason records, then consider that Derek is also one of just two players to ever accumulate 3,000 hits, 250 home runs, 300 stolen bases, and 1,200 RBI in the history of the game. The other player? Willie Mays.

15622a_lg3. Derek is one of just 28 players in baseball’s elite 3,000 hit club. He achieved his 3,000th hit on the biggest stage in baseball and with more pomp than any other player before him, hitting a home run off one of the best pitchers in baseball, going 5-5 on the day, and driving in the game’s winning run, a performance that will be remembered and replayed forever.

14501a_lg4. And the hits didn’t stop there. This summer, Derek passed the immortal Honus Wagner for most hits ever by a shortstop, and then he passed Adrian “Cap” Anson to earn the #6 spot on baseball’s all-time hits leaders list. Those who will remain ahead of him in the top five are Tris Speaker, Stan Musial, Hank Aaron, Ty Cobb, and Pete Rose. That’s not just good company he’s in; it’s the greatest ever. What is perhaps most remarkable about Jeter’s standing among these players, however, is that Speaker and Musial both played 22 seasons, Aaron played 23, and Cobb and Rose both played 24. Jeter, just 20. His way, and on his terms.

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5. In short, Derek Jeter is one of baseball’s all-time greats, and we’ve been more than lucky to watch his career. His famous “flip” play in the bottom of the seventh inning in Game 3 of the 2001 ALDS, his gutsy “dive” into the stands against the Red Sox, and his clutch hitting and never-ever-hesitating hustle will be highlights for the eternity of baseball. He stands in direct lineage to those who wore single-digit NY Yankee jerseys before him: 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, and 1. Like all these legends in pinstripes, Derek’s legacy will only continue to grow after he retires, bridging the generation gap as only baseball can do, as millions of fans face the existential question: will there really ever be another like him?

15758a_lg6. Drafted straight out of Kalamazoo Central High School and quickly becoming one of the most touted prospects in Yankee history, Derek can be found on 325 different baseball cards produced between his draft year of 1992 and his rookie season of 1996, and there is considerable debate about whether or not all of these cards should be considered rookie cards. His traditional rookie card year has always been 1993, but collecting has changed in recent years, and most collectors are now more inclined to pursue his many more challenging cards produced during his ROY-winning season of 1996, when we watched with wonder as the rookie helped lead the Yankees to their first World Series Championship in nearly two decades, than to collect only his cards from 1993, when he batted .295 in his first full season of Single A, still three seasons away from his official MLB rookie season.

15335a_lg7. Jeter’s rookie years of 1992 to 1996 correspond to the hobby development of insert or “chase” cards — special, limited edition cards randomly inserted into packs, many of which were super-short-printed variations, or parallel versions, of a player’s regular or base card — and his rookie season of 1996 would be the first year that saw products with significantly more than the two basic tiers of print runs that had thus far characterized the insert card development of the early to mid 1990s. Instead of products with just a regularly issued card and a single parallel insert of that regular issue — like Finest Refractors, Topps Gold, and Upper Deck Electric Diamond, for example — there were now products by Bowman, Leaf, and Select Certified that had as many as a half dozen different parallels, each one produced in smaller quantities than the last, some with print runs as small as just 30. Scarcer than even the T206 Wagner, cards like the famous 1996 Select Certified Mirror Gold are also some of the most beautiful cards ever made. Their development happened during Derek’s rookie season, which makes collecting his rookie season cards that much more challenging and fun.15619a_lg

8. If 1992-1996 is the birth of modern insert cards, then 1997-1999 is their renaissance or golden age. During the late ’90s, modern card manufacturers developed several more innovations that now, two decades later, still dominate the industry. These innovations included game-used cards, serial-numbered cards, and the development of the ever coveted 1/1 or one-of-one masterpiece cards, when manufacturers produced an ultimate parallel of a particular card limited to just one single copy made. Finally, let’s also not forget the incredible die-cut cards developed during the period, which may be common encounters in packs today, but in the late 90s they were among the most special pulls imaginable, some of which have remained non-existent in PSA 10 Gem Mint condition and were so intricate and cutting-edge — ha! — that they will most likely always will.

15443a_lg9. Just as the development of insert cards corresponded with Derek’s rookie years of 1992 to 1996, this distinct period of later 1990s inserts directly corresponds to the New York Yankees dynasty years of 1996 to 2000. Game-used and serial-numbered autograph cards, and even 1/1 cards, are now extremely common in today’s products, but in the late 90s they were new and exciting, as was the printing technology that had made them possible, and they remain among the most collected cards in the hobby. For Yankees fans and for those who collect The Captain, the appeal of collecting cards from these years is therefore twofold, since so many of the innovative cards from these years were groundbreaking, and since they also document one of the last real dynasties in the history of the game.

14455c_lg10. Finally, let’s not forget that Derek has played his entire 20-year career with the most successful franchise in all of sports history and with all of us watching as closely as New York City watches anything, and he’s done it all with class, integrity, and grace. For this reason, wherever the Yankees have traveled during his farewell season, millions of fans have stood in ovation, and thousands more have held signs saying “Thank You.” But thank you for what? For the memories? Sure. And for the championships? Yes, of course. But the thanks we owe Derek Jeter have as much if not more to do with those three little words — class, integrity, and grace — than with anything. I’m not even sure what those things are these days, but I know that I’ve seen them whenever I’ve watched Derek play, and for that I will always be grateful.

15530b_lgDerek’s retirement announcement earlier this year took many of us by surprise, but it was in reality the ultimate classy act. Knowing that this would be his last season has helped him to pace and to preserve himself, and I’d certainly rather watch him with the knowledge of his retirement than to see him slowly decline over the next several seasons, even if those additional years could have brought him greater personal achievements, namely, the all-time hits record. But Derek doesn’t play for personal records, and he never has. He plays for wins, and that’s how he’ll be remembered. Although there were others before him and there will be many more to follow, years and years from now, he’ll be remembered best by his most common nickname: The Captain.

To consign your Derek Jeter and other New York Yankees items to Small Traditions November Holiday Auction, and to learn about the company’s popular Cost-Free Grading and Collection Management Services, please call 303.832.1975 or write info@smalltraditions.com, and be sure to follow the company on Facebook and on Twitter for more updates.

Small Traditions Celebrates One Year of Monthly Masterpieces Plus Auctions

August 26, 2013

3This month marks the one-year anniversary of Small Traditions’ Monthly Masterpieces Plus internet auctions, and the company couldn’t be more pleased with the engaging and unique mix of cards it is currently offering in its Monthly Masterpieces Plus #12 Auction, which accurately represents the direction in which its team is working hard to grow Small Traditions. The company made a splash last year when it established itself as one of the leading auction firms within the hobby to offer a significant selection of high quality modern cards outside of eBay, but over the ensuing months the company began offering a larger and larger selection of vintage cards, autographs, and other memorabilia, clearly evident in this month’s auction, which culminates this Saturday night, 8/31 at 11:11 PM EST at www.smalltraditions.com.

2According to Small Traditions founder, Dave Thorn, “One of my hardest tasks each month is to organize our auction in a way that engages our wide ranging user base, highlighting our masterpieces while still giving appropriate attention to all our consignors’ items. The harder an auction is to organize usually means the better the auction is, overall, and that was definitely the case this month.”

4Indeed, browsing the company’s auction in gallery format shows a compelling mix of cards quite unlike anything else you’ll find within the hobby. In typical Small Traditions fashion, the current auction begins with a handful of some of the most sought after Derek Jeter Rookie Cards in existence, including PSA 10 Gem Mint examples of the famous 1996 Mirror Blue and Mirror Red cards from The Captain’s ROY season of 1996, which were limited to just 45 and 90 copies produced, respectively, followed by a PSA 10 Gem Mint example of Derek’s 1996 Leaf Signature Autograph Rookie Card.  The auction then briefly turns to some high-grade vintage non-sport rarities from the 1965 Topps Battle and 1966 Batman sets before presenting some exceptionally high-grade, low pop masterpieces from late 1960s Topps baseball, including Pop 1 PSA 10 Gem Mint examples of Don Drysdale from the 1969 set, Big D’s last regular Topps card, as well as that season’s AL ROY, Lou Piniella, plus others. Up next are a handful of scarce modern rookie cards, including a seldom seen 1982 Fleer Cal Ripken Test Rookie Card, a pair of Michael Jordan Rookie Cards, a pair of rare Bo Jackson Auburn Greats Rookie Cards, and then some of the hobby’s rarest Ken Griffey Jr. and Frank Thomas Rookie Cards.

6After another round of exceptionally low pop Derek Jeter rookie card proofs and parallels, which include a PSA 10 Gem Mint example of Jeter’s 1993 Classic Best Autograph, the Captain’s only signed card from his traditional rookie card year of 1993, the auction then turns back the clock to offer presentable upper grade examples from early Bowman and Leaf sets, with high-grade copies of Jackie Robinson, Roy Campanella, Warren Spahn, Ted Williams, Mickey Mantle, and more. After a 1958 Topps complete set, the auction then takes an interesting turn to the frozen pond with one of the hobby’s highest grade cards from the 1953-54 Parkhurst set followed by a unique selection of Rick Nash Rookie Cards and Game-Used Autographs.

5The auction then takes yet another turn back to Derek Jeter, with an alluring selection of late 1990s inserts, which are then followed by a lengthy list of early 50s Topps and Bowman cards from the likes of Mickey Mantle, Whitey Ford, and Yogi Berra, before the presentation of a partial 1954 Topps high-grade set break, offered in single lots. More vintage card offerings follow, with many Mickey Mantle cards and other stars, before returning to a lengthy run of modern baseball cards, with many desirable high-grade rookie cards and refractors. Up next is a compelling mix of vintage and modern football cards, and then the auction returns to baseball with a healthy offering of presentable mid-grade examples from the popular 1954 Bowman, 1953 Topps, and 1952 Topps sets, before closing out with a colorful selection of print art and another round of high-grade vintage non-sport cards.

1An alternative to eBay and to other high-priced auction services, Small Traditions conducts monthly internet auctions with $1 starting bids, no reserves, and free shipping on single graded card lots, whether you win one or 101 of them. Small Traditions also offers a 0% sellers fee for consignors plus free grading with PSA and BGS on cards valued over $100, and it is the only auction company in the hobby to offer both free selling and free grading services. Call 303.832.1975 or write info@smalltraditions.com to learn more and to see if your cards qualify. Currently, the company is aggressively seeking rare vintage and modern single graded card consignments for its September 28 and October (Nov. 2) auctions.

Small Traditions Delivers Big Results In Monthly Masterpieces Plus #11 Auction

August 7, 2013

6061a_lgDenver-based auction firm, Small Traditions LLC, successfully concluded its 11th consecutive Monthly Masterpieces Plus auction late Saturday night from the 38th Annual National Sports Collectors Convention in Chicago, and the results were big. “Our favorite motto is ‘Small Traditions, Big Results,'” said company founder, Dave Thorn, a former teacher and research writer for catalog auction companies like Mile High and Goodwin and Co. “We say it often, usually to motivate us through the long days and nights that go into preparing each of our auctions, but it’s encouraging to see so many of our realized prices standing behind those words.”

After concluding the company’s largest-ever auction in June, consisting of nearly 1,200 lots and 10,000 bids, and then preparing6072a_lg free consignor graded card submissions for last week’s National in Chicago and also next week’s East Coast National in New York, the company faced a serious challenge in pulling off its Monthly Masterpieces Plus #11. Thorn admitted that he had reservations about conducting the auction from Chicago on the last night of The National, the country’s largest and most attended sports collectibles show. However, the gamble appears to have paid off. The hobby’s newest and fastest growing auction company realized exceptionally strong results for the popular products around which it appears to have generated a niche, including graded rookie cards, autographs, oddball items, and, most notably, Derek Jeter cards.

5928a_lgA 2002 Bowman Chrome Joe Mauer Gold Refractor Autograph BGS 9 RC Rookie Card sold for $1,367, and a 1967 Dexter Press Roberto Clemente PSA 9 card sold for $1,242. A 1990 Leaf Frank Thomas Rookie Card and a 1991 Bowman Chipper Jones Rookie Card, both graded BGS 10 Pristine for their respective consignors at no cost, each sold for $846, strong prices for items from the so-called junk era of the early 1990s. But that’s nothing new for Small Traditions, one of the hobby’s leading sellers of ultra high-grade cards from the modern period, that is, the 1980s through today. A quick search of the company’s Results for these years from its first eleven auctions displays extraordinary price tags, and yet Small Traditions continues to also realize premium prices for high-grade cards from the 50s and 60s, such as these 1951 Topps Team Cards and 1955 Topps PSA Mint 9s from its recent auction.

The most impressive sales, however, came from the Derek Jeter market. Despite the Yankee Captain’s inactivity this season, demand for Derek’s collectibles has remained strong, a good indicator that demand will be even stronger when the 39 year old returns to play. According to Thorn, “Jeter has entered that rarefied air of sport nobility, with other world famous players like Michael Jordan and Mickey Mantle and Babe Ruth, in which demand for his collectibles will always be strong, always rising. Even if Jeter never played another game,” continued Thorn, “he’ll be remembered as one of the most accomplished and beloved players, ever, and those heavily invested in his collectibles should expect serious spikes in demand when Jeter retires and then again when he enters the Hall of Fame. But for now, I think most fans are hoping Jete can teach himself to stop playing like a 20-year old and tough out another 3 or 4 years of play, taking aim at becoming baseball’s third-ever player to join the 4,000 hit club, behind Ty Cobb and Pete Rose.”

5728a_lgWhile a 1996 Select Certified Blue Parallel Pop 2 PSA 10 RC brought in $1,655 in Thorn’s most recent auction, and a handful of other rookie cards topped $1,000 in bids, what was most surprising about many of the Jeter sales from Small Traditions Monthly Masterpieces Plus #11 auction was that some of the strongest prices came from non-rookie card material. Among many other record prices, a 1997 Topps Gallery Peter Max Autograph Insert Pop 1 PSA 10 sold for $3,554, a 1997 Pinnacle Certified Mirror Gold PSA 9 sold for $1,504, a 1999 Skybox Molten Metal Titanium Fusion Pop 2 PSA 10 earned $1,242, and a 1999 Fleer Brilliants Gold Pop 1 PSA 10 brought $1,129. Thorn attributes much of his company’s success in the Jeter market to the strong core of Jeter collectors in his rapidly growing customer base and to the work he puts into JeterCards.com, but the math behind the big sales is pretty basic as well. The latter three cards listed above, for example, were produced in extremely limited print runs of just 40, 30, 50, and 99 total copies made, respectively, and Michael Jordan cards from some of the same brands and low-numbered insert sets from the late 1990s have been consistently selling for $5,000 to even $10,000 for years.

5710a_lg“I’ve been encouraging my Jeter customers to learn more about the late 1990s insert market because, just like the Jordan market, I think that’s where we’ll see the strongest numbers in the future.” According to Thorn, there are only so many Jeter rookie cards—about 330 different ones, to be more specific—and late 90s insert cards number in the 1,000s and encompass the Yankees so-called dynasty years of 1996 to 2000, and they’re also some of the rarest and prettiest cards ever made. “It’s the perfect storm,” says Thorn. “Younger collectors might not think anything special of cards numbered to 50 or 100, since you can pull one from just about every single wax pack these days, but it was a different story in the 1990s, when the manufacturers first developed the concept.

5881a_lgThe problem is,” continued Thorn, “this is also the period when baseball cards, a very simple collectible until that time, became incredibly confusing, with multiple parallels and various tiers of print runs, some as low as 20, 10, 5, even 1.” Thorn insists that for all the quality cards from the late 1990s in the market, there are 1,000 times more junk cards that scrupulous dealers will try to push on uninformed customers. “It happens every day on eBay,” he says. “Just because a card is a Pop 3 PSA 10, for now, doesn’t mean it is necessarily rare. More likely, the card is just so common and insignificant that no one has graded very many. So some sellers will try to charge $300 for a card like this, when any Joe could easily buy 30 raw copies and grade 20 of them Gem Mint, all for the same price.”

5884a_lgAs such, Thorn stresses caution and knowledge when shopping for late 1990s Jeter cards, and he encourages collectors to learn as much as possible before clicking the Buy-It-Now button on eBay. “I hate to see collectors I know paying absurd prices for common cards when they can purchase a PSA 10 card numbered to 100 in our no reserve auctions for the same price. In his final remarks, Thorn concluded that “the Jeter market is a true community. Most of the bigger Jeter collectors and dealers know each other, and most are very friendly and happy to share the information they’ve collected over the years. For most collectors, in fact, figuring out that information has been just as fun and challenging as collecting the actual cards. Got a question? All you have to do is ask. Start by contacting advanced collectors on the PSA Set Registry, try the Collectors Universe and Freedom Cardboard forums, or call or write Small Traditions. You’ll be glad you did.”

An alternative to eBay and to other high-priced auction services, Small Traditions conducts monthly internet auctions with $1 starting bids, no reserves, and free shipping on single graded card lots, whether you win one or 101 of them. Small Traditions also offers a 0% sellers fee for consignors plus free grading with PSA and BGS for cards valued over $100, and it is the only auction company in the hobby to offer both free selling and free grading services. Call 303.832.1975 or write info@smalltraditions.com to learn more and to see if your cards qualify. Currently, the company is aggressively seeking rare vintage and modern single graded card consignments for its August 31, September 28, and October (Nov. 2) auctions.