Tag Archives: auction house

Small Traditions LLC’s Spring Premium “Black Magic” Auction Presents The Joe Morrison Collection; Auction Preview & Consignments Wanted by 4/15

Important Note Regarding Consignments Wanted by 4/15: In addition to the items featured throughout this post, Small Traditions LLC is seeking a small selection of additional high-end items valued $1,000 and up for our 4th Annual Spring Premium Auction. The auction is already nearly full, so please don’t wait until the consignment deadline of April 15th, especially if you’d like to guarantee premium placement for your premium items, and especially if you’d like to take advantage of our Cost-Free Grading promotion. Call 303.832.1975 or write info@smalltraditions.com today.

March 23, 2016 – Denver, CO.  Like most athletes who played parts of their careers in the Empire State, Joe Morrison of the New York Football Giants earned his share of nicknames: Old Dependable, they called him, Mr. Versatility, Captain, Most Valuable Player, Mr. Wonderful even. After his playing career, he earned yet another name when he surprised the nation and coached the USC Gamecocks to the Gator Bowl, earning himself honors as the Walter Camp National College Football Coach of the Year. “The Man in Black,” they dubbed him in Columbia. And USC’s unforgettable season: “Black Magic.”

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“The Ultimate Team Player,” Giants owner Wellington Mara called him, Morrison didn’t just play part of his career in New York. He played all 14 seasons of it there. Drafted in 1959 out of Cincinnati, where he still holds most team passing and scoring records, the Lima, Ohio native played seven different positions in blue until his retirement in 1972. At the press conference in which he announced his retirement, then Giants head coach Alex Webster told the crowd that nobody would ever wear #40 for the Giants again, and so Old Dependable became the tenth player in team history to be honored by having his jersey retired.

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To this day, Morrison remains among the Giants’ team leaders in several categories:

  • 14 Years Played — 2nd
  • 184 Games Played — 5th
  • 65 Total Touch Downs — 3rd
  • 47 Receiving Touch Downs — 3rd
  • 395 Receptions — 3rd
  • 4,993 Receiving Yards — 4th

Some other statistics that can’t be found at Pro-Football-Reference.com include Morrison’s seven seasons named as team captain and his five team MVP awards. Even more impressive than his numbers, however, was the high esteem in which he was held by teammates, coaches, student players, community leaders, and fans. Indeed, long before other accomplished New York captains like Thurman Munson and Derek Jeter captured the hearts of the sporting world, there was Joe Morrison. Always there. Always dependable. Always respected.

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A testament to both his leadership and his knowledge of the game, Coach Joe Morrison was one of only a few major college head coaches to never serve as an assistant coach. In 1987, he earned further recognition as the Southern Independent Coach of the Year, and in 1988 he earned yet another honor with his selection as one of three head coaches to lead the East players in the College Football All Star Game at the Hula Bowl. A year later, after winning his 100th game at age 51, he tragically fell victim to congestive heart failure, leaving the USC community and the college football world in shock, and departing this world just as abruptly as he had seemed to storm it.

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Some notable names who played or coached under Joe Morrison include:

  • Charlie Weis
  • Al Groh
  • Robert Brooks
  • Sterling Sharpe
  • Harold Green
  • Brad Edwards

Small Traditions LLC is honored to have been selected to present the Joe Morrison Collection in our forthcoming April online event, from 4/17 to 4/30, which we have appropriately dubbed our Spring Premium “Black Magic” Auction. In addition to an impressive selection of high-grade sports cards and rare autographs, the auction will also include the following items from the estate of Coach Joe Morrison, several of which are previewed throughout this post:

  • Joe Morrison 1959 Rookie Year Game-Used New York Giants #40 Jersey
  • Joe Morrison 1958 College All Stars Full Uniform
  • 1959 New York Giants Eastern Division Champions Team Signed Football
  • Iconic Coach Joe Morrison Black Jacket Worn During Every Game
  • Joe Morrison Game-Worn 1984 Gator Bowl Sweater
  • Joe Morrison College Recruitment Letter Collection
  • Joe Morrison NY Giants Correspondence Collection w/ 1972 Contract
  • 1967 NFL Touchdown Club Most Valuable Player Award
  • 1985 Frank McGuires Award for Athletic Excellence
  • 1988 Commemorative 100th Win Sterling Silver Plate
  • 1987 Hand Written Letter From President George H. Bush

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The Tucson Find: One of The Largest & Most Comprehensive Collections Ever Assembled Up For Auction

Beginning with our current Super Bowl 50 Auction, which ends this Saturday night, February the 6th, Small Traditions will be offering several thousand PSA-graded single cards and complete sets in binders from the historic Tucson Find this past summer. What exactly is the Tucson Find? Without exaggeration, the Tucson Find is among the largest, most comprehensive and impressive sports card collections ever assembled. The collection consists of nearly 4,000 binders, most of which contained multiple sets, complete with all inserts, errors and other variations, spanning all brands from all sports, dating from the 1940s through the early 2000s.

Not only is the Tucson Find remarkable for its breadth and inclusiveness, but the collection is noted for its meticulous attention to the condition of the hundreds of thousands of cards it contains. Even the cards from the 1940s and 1950s display immaculate, pack-fresh qualities, with particular attention to centering and to bold colors. In fact, the collection yielded the hobby’s second-ever 1953 Topps Mickey Mantle to grade PSA 10 Gem Mint at The National Sports Collectors Convention in Chicago this past summer, and every one of the 1,000s of single cards submitted by Small Traditions and being offered this winter has graded either PSA 10 Gem Mint or PSA 9 Mint, with ample opportunities for upgrades or crossovers to BGS 9.5 Gem Mint and BGS 10 Pristine.

Small Traditions is honored to have been selected to handle the modern portion of the Tucson Find, dating from 1980 through the early 2000s, and we are offering several thousand PSA-graded singles and complete sets still in binders in the following events:

Importantly, sets that contained key rookie cards of considerable value, such as the 1998 SP Authentic Football set, have been broken for grading and are not being offered in set form. An overwhelming number of complete sets, however, still offer an abundance of grading opportunities. Judging by the PSA 10 1953 Topps Mantle and the thousands of other cards graded PSA 9 Mint and PSA 10 Gem Mint, the offered sets are likewise in Mint to Gem Mint condition and boast considerable value, especially with their minimum bid prices of between $25 and $50.

If you have not already, register for Small Traditions monthly auctions here.

Learn how to grade and auction your cards and don’t spend a penny out-of-pocket.

Big Results in Small Traditions Exclusive 100-Lot April Premium Auction

2Small Traditions LLC recently concluded its Exclusive 100-Lot April Premium Auction, setting several industry-wide sales records and reaching new milestones for the Denver-based auction firm. Despite its compact size, the auction closed at nearly a quarter million dollars, a new high for Small Traditions, which conducts monthly no-reserve auctions at its website, with every fourth month’s auction limited to just 100-200 premium lots. Each item in the premium auctions must have a minimum value of approximately $1,000, and the company strives to present each of these higher-end lots with a thoughtful and interactive description that links to hobby resources like PSACardFacts and BaseballCardPedia, and to player statistics, video highlights, and more — an engaging and information-rich approach that is at the core of the Small Traditions experience.

“The Premium format allows all lots to share in the spotlight, and 3the limited selection really encourages bidder competition,” says Small Traditions founder, Dave Thorn, a former teacher and research and writing coordinator for a pair of larger auction companies at the forefront of the hobby. Those are nice side effects of a decision Thorn made, he admits, strictly to help pace him and his small team, who work almost round-the-clock to coordinate their much larger Monthly Masterpieces Plus Auctions, which average anywhere from 500 to 1,500 lots. “We needed to take a break, but we didn’t want to miss a month, so the limited format developed naturally.”

5In addition to some staggering prices realized for both vintage and modern sports cards, perhaps what was most surprising about the company’s April Premium auction was that at least half of all the cards sold had come to Small Traditions in raw, ungraded form. As a part of its cost-free consignment process, Small Traditions will pay up front to grade its customers’ cards, only charging for the grading services after the sale of the cards, pending their owners’ approval of the grading results. The fee for selling on Small Traditions is 0%, so there’s absolutely no out-of-pocket expense to its consignors.

“So much work goes into sorting and closely inspecting our 15customers’ cards to identify candidates for grading,” says Thorn, “and that’s just the start of what is really a very expensive and challenging process, as it should be. So many customers expect high grades for their cards because they’ve been carefully preserved, but most don’t understand how rare Mint or Gem Mint cards from the 50s, 60s and 70s really are, how the perfect ones, even in many products from later years in the 80s and the 90s, are extreme statistical anomalies.”

That’s when the former teacher in Thorn steps in, as he works to ensure that every Small Traditions consignor understands not just the process of grading, but the stringent standards involved and the many challenges submitters face. The end result 9is that the grading process increases the value of the consignors’ cards, it increases the company’s profit from the flat 15% buyers premium it charges, and it brings some “great new-old cards” back into the hobby, a win-win-win for everyone involved.

“Great new-old cards” might be an understatement. Check out the following highlights from Small Traditions’ Exclusive 100-Lot April Premium Auction, which will be view-able at the company’s website until it begins its next auction on May 21st (consignment deadline Friday May 16th) . You can always search all of Small Traditions ended items, however, through the company’s user friendly results section, where you can reverse sort up to 5,000 items to see the top selling material in any search category. Small Traditions is also very active in social media and conducts compelling giveaways through both its Facebook page and its Twitter account, where it has awarded tens of thousands of dollars in giveaways since starting its monthly auctions just two years ago, all for free. Just “like” and/or “follow” today in order to play. 

  • 1996 Select Certified Mirror Gold Derek Jeter SGC 96 — $16,995 RECORD
  • 1980 Charlotte O’s Police Issue Cal Ripken Jr. RC PSA 4 — $11,721 RECORD
  • 1964 Topps #541 Braves Rookies Phil Niekro RC PSA 10 — $9,670 RECORD
  • 1987 Fleer #57 Michael Jordan RC PSA 10 — $9,963
  • 1979 O-Pee-Chee #18 Wayne Gretzky RC PSA 9 — $8,791
  • 2000 Bowman Chrome #340 Albert Pujols RC BGS 9.5 — $7,033
  • 1971 Topps #5 Thurman Munson All Star Rookie BGS 9.5 — $5,568 RECORD
  • 1990 Topps #USA1 George Bush White House Issue BGS 8 — $5,568
  • 1992 Little Sun High School Signatures Derek Jeter RC PSA 10 — $5,275
  • 1952 Topps #311 Mickey Mantle SGC Authentic — $4,982
  • 1993 SP Foil #279 Derek Jeter RC BGS/BVG 9.5 — $4,396 RECORD
  • 1954 Topps #8 Gordie Howe PSA 8 — $3,810
  • 1954 Bowman #66 Ted Williams PSA 8 (OC) — $3,517 RECORD
  • 1998 Fleer SI Extra Edition 1 of 1 #64 Derek Jeter PSA Authentic — $2,462
  • 1996 Select Certified Mirror Blue #100 Derek Jeter PSA 10 — $2,228 RECORD
  • 1986 Houston Astros Miller Light Nolan Ryan PSA 10 — $1,408 RECORD
  • 1951 Connie Mack’s All Stars #8 Christy Mathewson PSA 5.5 — $1,056 RECORD

Dave Thorn and his team extend their thanks to the countless collectors both past and present whose passions have made a place for Small Traditions to exist, with special thanks to the company’s growing list of consignors and bidders, without whom its monthly auctions wouldn’t exist, as well as to its many fans on Facebook and followers on Twitter.

Consignments Wanted for Multiple Summer Auctions

Small Traditions is currently seeking consignments for its next three Monthly Masterpieces Plus Auctions as well as its Exclusive 100-Lot August Premium Auction and its Exclusive Derek Jeter September Farewell Auction. Please write info@smalltraditions.com or call 303.832.1975 for more information and to reserve premium space for your collectible treasures today.

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EXPLAIN IT TO ME: The 15 Minute Rule

A throwback to the earliest days of online auctions, the much maligned 15 Minute Rule is an automated method for ending an auction. It is the reason so many auctions last into the wee hours of the morning, and it is also the reason why some of the most coveted items in a given auction sometimes sell for multiple times their estimated values. At its simplest, the rule stipulates that the auction will not close until 15 minutes have passed with no bids being placed on any item within the entire auction. At that point, we assume, all bids are in, everyone has had a fair chance to bid, and so the proverbial gavel hits the sound block, the auction ends, and we all go to bed. I’ve been in the auction business for almost a decade now, and I’ve participated in hundreds if not thousands of auctions both as a buyer and as a consignor (or seller) and also as an auctioneer. On more than a few occasions, I’ve been kept awake until 4:00 AM to guarantee my winning bids. Other times I’ve set my alarm for 2:00 AM to enter my final bids, and still other times I’ve slept through an auction closing and completely missed my opportunity to bid. Today is the final day of Small Traditions Monthly Auction #6, and many of my customers have asked me to explain the 15 Minute Rule, so here’s an explanation of how the Small Traditions 15 Minute Rule works as well as a brief discussion of its pros and cons.

At Small Traditions, we’ve adopted the simplest version of the 15 Minute Rule. Our Monthly Auctions close on the final Thursday of every month at precisely 11:11 PM EST, at which time they enter into Extended Bidding. At that point, the 15 Minute Rule goes into effect, and each time a bid is placed within the auction, a new 15-minute timer begins to clock down to zero, and the auction will not close until a full fifteen minutes has passed with no bids being placed within the auction. IMPORTANT: All active Small Traditions bidders in good standing are permitted to bid on ANY item within the auction during the Extended Bidding period.

Of course, the primary reason we do this is simple: to generate more bids and to maximize prices for the lots within our auctions. For this reason, our consignors tend to love the 15 Minute Rule, while our bidders tend to hate it. The inevitable result of the rule is that most auctions last until 2:00 AM, 3:00 AM, or even 4:00 AM. But 4:00 AM where? 4:00 AM in New York is just 1:00 AM in Los Angeles, and while that’s still pretty late for a Thursday night, it’s just 10:00 PM in Hawaii and just 6:00 PM in Japan and Taiwan, where we have more than a few registered bidders. And so another primary reason we use the 15 Minute Rule is to give ALL bidders (east coast, west coast, far east cost) a fair chance to bid on the final night of our auctions.

The obvious complaint against the 15 Minute Rule is that it keeps bidders up too late, and several companies have developed alternatives to the rule to placate their bidders. Some auction houses apply the fifteen minute rule to multiple sessions within a single auction, while other houses apply the rule on a lot-by-lot basis, meaning that each lot closes individually after 15 minutes pass with no bidding activity. To the angst of consignors, a third alternative is to abandon the 15 Minute Rule and simply close the auction at an appointed time, but where’s the fun in that? In all sincerity, some of my fondest memories in this business have come on auction night, when bidding wars ensue and consignors realize record prices for items they were reluctant to sell, and when bargain-hunting bidders score incredible deals about which they brag to their friends the next day on chat forums across the internet.

A final note and a few suggestions regarding the 15 Minute Rule. Like all auction houses, Small Traditions reserves the right to use our discretion and to end our auctions at any time, especially when bids have slowed to a snail’s pace and the sky is paling. If you prefer not to stay awake until mid-morning, then consider setting your alarm for midnight, 1:00 AM, or 2:00 AM in order to check your status. The average ending time of our first have dozen auctions has been about 2:00 AM MST (Mountain Standard Time; we are in Denver). Alternatively, you can decide upon a price you are willing to pay for an item and use the Max Bid feature, available on all lots, or you can always call Small Traditions at 303.832.1975 and request a telephone bid up to a specific price before the auction ends. After all, more so than on other nights, on auction night, we work overtime.

Thanks for supporting Small Traditions, and good luck!

Dave Thorn